Thesis Title: Defining Intelligence: The Scientific Construction of Intelligent Belonging in the Twentieth Century

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University. My research lies at the intersection of science and politics, ideas and institutions, in the United States in the twentieth century. My dissertation, “Defining Intelligence: The Scientific Construction of Intelligent Belonging in the Twentieth Century,” is a transnational history of intelligence testing that investigates the consequences of intelligence testing for modern legal and social constructions of citizenship and rights. I grew up in California and received my undergraduate degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley. After graduation I worked for the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park. Since starting my graduate study I have added to my professional archival experience at the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC, and at the Alan Mason Chesney Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical School.

Main Advisor: Professor Burgin, Professor Walters