My research focuses on the history of money, crime, and the economy in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world. My dissertation, “Circulating Counterfeits: Making Money and its Meanings in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic” reconstructs the practices of men and women who, working in regional and trans-Atlantic networks, set about forging the many coins and paper notes that circulated in Britain's Atlantic empire. I argue that counterfeiting had wide-ranging implications for market development, cultures of money and the market, and imperial authority in the eighteenth century. The project underlines the importance of illegal enterprises to economic development and state formation and contributes to a growing body of scholarship that seeks to denaturalize and historicize money, using counterfeiting as an entry point to understanding the everyday politics of money in the British Atlantic world.

My work has appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly and been supported by long-term fellowships from the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the American Council of Learned Societies.

Thesis Title: "Circulating Counterfeits: Making Money and its Meanings in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic"

Main Advisor: Professor Ditz