I am a doctoral student in the Department of History, working with Professors Richard L. Kagan and Gabriel Paquette. My research centers on the history of the early modern Spanish monarchy and on the historical anthropology of religious practice and belief. I am particularly interested in transgressions such as sacrilege and image desecration, and the role that converts, of both Jewish and Muslim origin, played in them. Addressing questions of ritualistic crime and punishment as well as confessional differentiation, my dissertation examines inquisitorial trial records, literary sources of various kinds, and religious art. Although my focus is on the Catholic monarchy, I am equally interested in the practices and writings of ex-Iberian Jewish and Muslim communities in Europe and North Africa.

As of 2013, I am affiliated as an Early Stage Researcher to the Madrid-based project, "Conversion, Overlapping Religiosities, Polemic, and Interaction [CORPI]", led by Professor Mercedes García-Arenal (CSIC, Spain). Before coming to Hopkins I earned my BA and MA in history at the University of Tel Aviv and worked for Ha'aretz weekly literary supplement, where, among other things, I used to write the crossword puzzle.

Main Advisor: Professor Kagan, Professor Paquette