Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Writing Systems of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.302 (01)

The Indigenous peoples of the Americas developed several writing systems, including Zapotec, Isthmian, Mixteca-Puebla, Inka Khipu, and Maya. Of these, Maya script stands out as among the most complex. In this course you will learn about the different writing systems of the Americas, as you acquire the skills to “read” Maya script, interpret complex artistic programs and decipher numbers, dates and names of individuals who lived long ago, as well as build an understanding of how archaeologists utilize such information alongside the material record to illuminate histories and narratives difficult if not impossible to obtain otherwise.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco (Franco)
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

American Cultural Criticism
AS.100.240 (01)

This course explores 20th century U.S. history through the works of writers and artists. We will ask how essays, novels, performance, and art can function as cultural and social criticism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Hawkey, Chloe I
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (01)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (02)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (01)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (02)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, social democracy, the welfare state, the relationship to the US and the Soviet Union, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration, neoliberalism, and the EU. We will discuss and analyze academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

The French Revolution
AS.100.310 (01)

Political, social and cultural history of a turning-point in European history that witnessed the birth and death of democracy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

The Enlightenment
AS.100.314 (01)

Examines the Enlightenment, an intellectual movement that swept Europe in the eighteenth century to shape the modern world. Topics include science and religion; print culture; gender and sociability; political economy; and race, slavery, and colonialism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Annales School
AS.100.343 (01)

An examination of twentieth-century historiographical thought with close reading of literature from the French Annales tradition: Marc Bloch, Lucien Febvre, Fernand Braudel, Emmanuel le Roy Ladurie, Jacques le Goff, Jacques Revel and Roger Chartier. All texts in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zheng, Xinhe (Vaclav)
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from Baltimore
AS.100.379 (01)

Using textual and visual documents (including books from Peabody Library), we will examine the contrasts of Brazilian history and culture, and its connections with 19th and 20th century Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle Ages
AS.100.383 (01)

Compares religious transformation in medieval Europe and the Middle East (ca. 600-1500), including conquest and conversion; conversion narratives; apostasy, martyrdom and other encounters between medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken one history course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes at home and abroad, how sports were used in domestic and foreign policy, and how Cold War sports reinforce or challenge notions of race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA

Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East
AS.100.387 (01)

Explores the daily lives of non-elites in the medieval Middle East—food; housing; clothes; marriage and divorce; urban festivals—through primary documents (e.g. letters, court records) and artifacts (e.g. clothing). Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken one history course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

Think Globally, Research Locally: Early Maryland and the World
AS.100.393 (01)

A research-intensive seminar, this course uses the rich history of Maryland to approach broader themes in early modern American and global history including colonialism, slavery, revolution, race, gender, and sex.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

The Gender Binary and American Empire
AS.100.396 (01)

This discussion-based seminar will explore some of the ways that the sex and gender binary was produced out of American statecraft in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular attention will be paid to US imperialism, both domestically in its settler form, as well as in Hawaii, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. What happens to the study of the modern gender binary if it is treated as a transnational artefact of US imperialism’s encounter with a multitude of cultures and nations?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Julian (Jules)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

The Trouble with "Diversity"
AS.100.397 (01)

Through archival, literary, and other cultural texts, this course considers the history of “diversity” as both a practice and concept, beginning with the arrival of “colorblindness” in the 1890s and moving through recent approaches to institutionalized multiculturalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, Nathan D, Mott, Shani T
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Decolonizing The Museum: Case Studies
AS.100.410 (01)

How do museums represent the world? The course will focus on the colonial legacy of museums and complicate discourses of decolonization by looking at a range of case studies. We will study the world’s fairs, artworks, artifacts, collections, curatorial practices, exhibition histories, repatriation requests, and exhibitionary modes of display, in order to analyze their relationship to histories of decolonization, temporality, translation, untranslatability, spectatorship, provenance, and the life of objects.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shirazi, Sadia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of Rights
AS.100.445 (01)

This seminar-style course will focus on discussing British and American political thought from the "Age of Revolutions", a period also of many critiques of Empire and of many works of Antislavery. Readings include Paine's Common Sense and Rights of Man, the Declaration of Rights, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers; works by Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; and antislavery works by Cugoano, Equiano, Rush, Wesley, and Wilberforce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at Hopkins
AS.100.450 (03)

It is time at Johns Hopkins University to rewrite our own history, one that takes a frank look at how race and racism have shaped the university and its community. This research seminar will build upon the recent revelations about founder Johns Hopkins, his family and their relationships to slave holding. Taught as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project, this seminar will center on new student research into the private and public records of early America, aiming to provide new insights into the nature and extent of Mr. Hopkins involvement in slavery and the lives of those Black Americans whom he held enslaved. Students will read deeply into the history of slavery, will learn new research techniques, and will publish the results of their work as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project. Students will also participate in public seminars where, alongside experts, they will bring this history to broader audiences, including the university community and residents of Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to America
AS.100.450 (05)

What matters most for good government: the quality of its institutions or of its rulers? Since the 16th c., western thought has focused on ‘structural’ concerns like the separation of powers. In his book Virtue Politics, James Hankins suggests that Renaissance humanism offered an alternative. Agnostic about institutions, ‘virtue politics’ cared about the souls of individuals in power. It said that the key to good politics lay in good education of the State’s leaders. This course traces ‘virtue politics’ from roots in Antiquity to ramifications for 1/6/2021 and the Poor People’s Campaign. Readings range widely across the western tradition, focusing especially on Liberal and Radical thought. They end with an evaluation of 20th- and 21st-c. American politics: from pragmatism to Civil Rights, critical pedagogy to Black feminism, fundamentalist evangelism to queer liberation. Participants collaboratively develop a “public engaging project” in lieu of a final exam.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: van den Arend, Alan R (Alan)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

History Research Lab: Medieval Modern: Monuments, Memory, and Destruction
AS.100.450 (06)

How do monuments engage public memory and identity? How do some monuments become so socially powerful that people seek to destroy them while others only become monumental in the moment of their destruction? This course addresses the historical work of monuments, memory, and the reworking of the past through processes of iconoclasm and commemoration stretching from the medieval world to the present, interrogating patterns of memorialization and commemoration from the destruction of the Jewish Temple to Charlottesville. These lessons inform our hands-on work to rethink select acts of memory on our campus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P, Lester, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

The Early Modern Inquisition in Global Perspective
AS.100.480 (01)

Examines the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions throughout their global empires, with a special emphasis on race, gender, and spirituality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.126 (01)

A basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/75
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Health & Society in Latin America & the Caribbean
AS.140.231 (01)

Medical practice is complex in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most countries in the region have universal healthcare; yet, the quality of clinical services varies widely, and is influenced by degrees of incorporation into—or marginalization from—social power structures. Many people take their health into their own hands by supplementing biomedicine with plant based remedies as well as religious and spiritual services. This course will interrogate the history and contemporary relevance of healthcare in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular interest in how medicine intersects with colonialism, slavery, capitalism, neo-colonialism, grassroots revolutionary movements, the Cold War, and neoliberalism. Drawing on films, visual and performance art, and music, students will consider the ways in which race, gender, indigeneity, ability, class, and nation have affected people’s experiences with medical practice. Informed by postcolonial and decolonial scholarship, we will also examine why Latin America and the Caribbean have become “laboratories” for the production of medical knowledge, and importantly, how that knowledge was created by indigenous, enslaved, and migrant people as well as professionals. Finally, we seek to understand individual health problems in relation to the social and political determinants of health. As such, the course prompts students to reflect on why healthcare professionals—in the United States and abroad—would benefit from historically-informed communication with patients and their communities. This is a discussion-based seminar that requires active participation. There are no exams. The course does not assume any previous knowledge of the history of medicine or Latin American history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: O'brien, Elizabeth
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Fanusie, Fatimah
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Democracy
AS.196.311 (01)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Democracy
AS.196.311 (02)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Democracy
AS.196.311 (03)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Democracy
AS.196.311 (04)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Women and Work in the US
AS.300.301 (01)

This course offers an introduction to the political forces, cultural values, and social factors which have shaped the history of women’s labor in the US. This course will ask question such as: Why do we place a higher value on work which takes place in the public sphere than work in the home? How do representations of work in literature and popular movies reinforce or subvert gender roles? How have women negotiated gendered and racial boundaries through political action or writing? Focusing on racialized labor, domestic labor, sex work, and factory work, the course will provide an interdisciplinary cultural study of women’s work relevant to our current historical moment. Authors discussed include Saidiya Hartman, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emma Goldman, and Kathi Weeks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Wells, Madeline (Maddie)
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies, with attention to the literature, film, culture, history, and politics of black life in the United States. Our reading list will likely include texts by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, Sutton Griggs, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Cultural Heritage in Crisis
AS.389.260 (01)

We explore the possible futures of cultural heritage and museums in times of accelerating climate change, pandemics, armed conflict and political and social turmoil by examining past and contemporary events.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita
  • Room: Gilman 150A  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO, INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-ARCH

Queer Oral History
AS.389.348 (01)

Students learn to conduct, analyze, and interpret their own oral histories as they contribute to a wide-ranging project documenting queer worldmaking in the Baltimore-Washington D.C. region. We engage with scholarship from performance studies, queer of color critique, LGBTQ history, and public humanities to consider the politics of storytelling and the promises of public-facing oral history projects. Students have the option of developing podcasts, multimedia projects, and public humanities proposals as their final assignment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph (Joseph)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: U.S. History of the Present
AS.001.120 (01)

Which ideas, movements, problems, and conflicts define the contemporary United States—and where did they come from? In this First-Year Seminar we’ll study the history of the last three decades to try to answer those questions. Using a wide range of written and visual materials, we’ll investigate and debate: how the end of the Cold War changed or didn’t change American self-image and policy; whether “liberalism” or “conservatism” triumphed in the period, and how those categories themselves changed throughout it; and what provoked culture wars—over identity, family, art, and speech—and made them so intractable and consequential. While we pursue these questions, we’ll also assess what’s appealing and perilous about studying the very recent past and using it to interpret the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Brann, Allon Y
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

FYS: What is a University?
AS.001.126 (01)

Readings and discussion in English. Many of the issues we grapple with today regarding higher education have a long history dating back to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when the first modern universities were founded in Germany. What is the relation of research to teaching? How do we define scholarship? What is the difference between professional training and academic study? How do we distinguish secondary education from higher learning? What obligations does the university have vis-à-vis the state, which often finances it in whole or in part? What protections does the state owe the university when it pursues research that runs counter to the interests of state? What purpose does the ivory tower serve in an age in which higher learning is no longer limited to the classroom but is widely available (via books, radio, television, the internet)? In this class we will explore the rich literature from the nineteenth century on the idea of the university and the value of learning. We will conclude the course with an examination of the German roots of Johns Hopkins. Cross-listed with History

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.294 (01)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Furstenberg, Francois, Kim, Hayang (Yumi)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.495 (01)

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.302 (01)Writing Systems of the Ancient AmericasTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMRossi, Franco (Franco)Gilman 177
 
HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.100.240 (01)American Cultural CriticismT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHawkey, Chloe I 
 
HIST-US
AS.100.243 (01)China: Neolithic to SongMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, Tobie 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.243 (02)China: Neolithic to SongMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMeyer-Fong, Tobie 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.250 (01)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPearsall, Sarah 
 
HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (02)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPearsall, Sarah 
 
HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria Elizabeth 
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, Elizabeth 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, Elizabeth 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.310 (01)The French RevolutionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMason, Laura 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.314 (01)The EnlightenmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, Michael 
 
MSCH-HUM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.343 (01)The Annales SchoolTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZheng, Xinhe (Vaclav)Gilman 308
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M 
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M 
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.379 (01)Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from BaltimoreTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean) 
 
HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.383 (01)Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle AgesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMEl-leithy, Tamer 
 
HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria Elizabeth 
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.387 (01)Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle EastT 3:00PM - 5:30PMEl-leithy, Tamer 
 
HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.393 (01)Think Globally, Research Locally: Early Maryland and the WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPearsall, Sarah 
 
HIST-US
AS.100.396 (01)The Gender Binary and American EmpireTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGill Peterson, Julian (Jules) 
 
HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.397 (01)The Trouble with "Diversity"T 3:00PM - 5:30PMConnolly, Nathan D, Mott, Shani T 
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.100.410 (01)Decolonizing The Museum: Case StudiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMShirazi, Sadia 
 
ARCH-RELATE
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 308
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.445 (01)Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of RightsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John W 
 
HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.450 (03)History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at HopkinsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff 
 
HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.450 (05)History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMvan den Arend, Alan R (Alan) 
 
HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.450 (06)History Research Lab: Medieval Modern: Monuments, Memory, and DestructionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P, Lester, AnneGilman 308
 
HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.480 (01)The Early Modern Inquisition in Global PerspectiveTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMRowe, Erin 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.130.126 (01)Gods and Monsters in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, Richard 
 
ARCH-RELATE
AS.140.231 (01)Health & Society in Latin America & the CaribbeanTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMO'brien, Elizabeth 
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFanusie, Fatimah 
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.311 (01)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha 
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.311 (02)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha 
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.311 (03)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha 
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.311 (04)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha 
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPomeranzev, Peter 
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.300.301 (01)Women and Work in the USTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMWells, Madeline (Maddie)Gilman 208
 
INST-AP
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, Nadia 
 
ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.389.260 (01)Cultural Heritage in CrisisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBalachandran, SanchitaGilman 150A
 
PMUS-INTRO, INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-ARCH
AS.389.348 (01)Queer Oral HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPlaster, Joseph (Joseph) 
 
AS.001.120 (01)FYS: U.S. History of the PresentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBrann, Allon Y 
 
HIST-US
AS.001.126 (01)FYS: What is a University?WF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, Rochelle 
 
AS.100.294 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFurstenberg, Francois, Kim, Hayang (Yumi) 
 
AS.100.495 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHindmarch-Watson, KatieGilman 308