Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Early Modern Europe & the Wider World
AS.100.103 (02)

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM

Early Modern Europe & the Wider World
AS.100.103 (01)

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (02)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (01)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (03)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Early Modern Europe & the Wider World
AS.100.103 (04)

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (04)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (01)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

Early Modern Europe & the Wider World
AS.100.103 (03)

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (02)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/24
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to present
AS.100.442 (01)

This course examines shifting understandings of the philosophical foundations, political implications, and social effects of the market economy since the early twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Free Speech and Censorship in the United States
AS.100.433 (01)

This undergraduate research seminar will examine censorship laws, practices, and debates from the eighteenth century to the present. In addition to discussing common readings, each student will choose a censorship case to research and present to the class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Gender and Sexuality in African History
AS.100.430 (01)

An upper-level history reading seminar with a focus on histories of gender and sexuality in colonial and postcolonial Africa.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Women & Modern Chinese History
AS.100.424 (01)

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Themes and Concepts in Jewish History
AS.100.180 (01)

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Japan in the World
AS.100.248 (02)

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Japan in the World
AS.100.248 (03)

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.194 (02)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in Africa
AS.100.205 (01)

A freshman seminar introducing students to the history of health, healing, and forms of medical practice in Africa over the last two centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Japan in the World
AS.100.248 (01)

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.211 (01)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories: identities, cultures, and the politics of queer pasts in North America and Western Europe, 1900-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories introduces students to the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of queer-identified subjects and communities in the US and Western Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.194 (01)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Art of Lying: Lie, Dissimulation, and the "Fake News" in Pre-modern Europe
AS.100.392 (01)

The course will examine the early modern attitudes to lie and dissimulation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Sex, Law and Islam
AS.100.421 (01)

ISIS, “virgins” in paradise, the sexual slavery of Yazidi women…. This course will use anthropological and historical studies to examine the long history of how rules and understandings about sex, sexuality, and gender have mattered in how people think about Islam.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/22
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/16
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Medieval Crusades: Cultural Convergence and Religious Conflict, 1000-1400
AS.100.390 (01)

This course explores the origins of the idea of crusading, examines the experiences of those who traveled east, and analyzes the cultures of contact that developed ca. 1095 and 1291.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850
AS.100.312 (01)

The course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the trans-Atlantic slave trade c. 1450-1850. It delves into the historiographical debates over the impact of the trade on the development of Africa, Europe and the Americas in the early modern period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the role of athletes and international competitions and how sports relate to race, gender, and class. We will discuss the ways in which sports confirm and consolidate but also challenge and change social structures and opportunities of self-fulfillment and social advancement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

In this class we focus on such topics as the transatlantic alliance, the Cold War divide, the arms race, détente, migration, European integration and the EU from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern World
AS.100.384 (01)

Each week we examine a commodity that defined a new era of global connectivity in the centuries after 1492, including money, medicines, slaves, and fashion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Peter to Putin: Survey
AS.100.305 (01)

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The French Revolution
AS.100.310 (01)

Political, social and cultural history of one of the great turning-points in European history. Previously offered as AS.100.204.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Entertaining America: Popular Culture from Blackface to Broadcast
AS.100.349 (01)

Entertaining America teaches students to employ digital mapping technology in order to understand the complex history of Popular Entertainment in American culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

History of Global Development
AS.100.395 (01)

This course explores development as an ideology and a practice. From colonialism to the Cold War to contemporary NGOs, we will interrogate the history of our attempts to improve the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present
AS.100.360 (01)

The Modern British World introduces some of the major themes and contestations tied to Britain’s rise to global dominance and its ultimate decline as an imperial power.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Japan in the World
AS.100.248 (04)

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Histories of Women and the Vote
AS.100.375 (01)

The year 2020 will mark 200 years since the 19th Amendment guaranteed American women the right to vote. Or did it? This course will examine the long history of women’s voting rights in the United States, including the story that extends from a convention at Seneca Falls, NY to a constitutional amendment. It will also examine alternative stories, especially those of women of color whose campaigns for the vote did not end in 1920 – and continue until today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.495 (01)

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Soviet-American Cold War
AS.100.346 (01)

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Women of the Book: Female Mystics, Miracles, and Material Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.389.325 (01)

Students will study and assess JHU’s new, unparalleled rare book and manuscript collection about the spiritual lives of women at the crossroads of religious mysticism, miracles, and material culture, 1450-1800.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level:
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, GRLL-FREN

Jim Crow in America
AS.100.486 (01)

This course explores the history, politics, and culture of legalized racial segregation in the United State between the mid-nineteenth and twentieth centuries – a regime commonly known as “Jim Crow.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Religions of Korea
AS.310.222 (01)

This course offers an overview of the religions of Korea, both indigenous and foreign, old and new. Attention will be paid to the history of these religions, their impact on society, as well as their teachings and objectives. Students will engage with various forms of secondary as well as primary sources including scriptures, sermons, and religious tracts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Japan from its Peripheries
AS.100.478 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the history of modern Japan from the perspective of regions and people often considered as belonging to its geographical, cultural, social, and political peripheries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'
AS.215.290 (01)

This course, taught in English, examines how indigenous and local (postcolonial) intellectuals in Latin America responded to the ideology and practices of Spanish Colonialism in the earliest post-conquest years (1532), continued to battle colonialism during the period of the wars of independence, and finally arrived at the production of an analysis that shows how modernity is but the other face of colonialism. Among key works to be discussed are Guaman Poma's illustrated sixteenth-century chronicles, D.F. Sarramiento's _Civilization and Barbarism_ (1845), and Anibal Quijano's "Coloniality of Power" (2000).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Korea in the World
AS.310.404 (01)

This seminar examines Korea’s interactions with the outside world including Japan, China, and the Americas, as well as Europe and Southeast Asia. We will touch upon a wide range of topics, including political, economic, and military interactions, as well as cultural, intellectual, and religious engagements. The purpose is to identify larger transnational trends and parallels in understanding Korea’s position in the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/70
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World
AS.194.201 (01)

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Museums and Identity
AS.211.329 (01)

The museum boom of the last half-century has centered largely around museums dedicated to the culture and history of identity groups, including national, ethnic, religious, and minority groups. In this course we will examine such museums and consider their long history through a comparison of the theory and practice of Jewish museums with other identity museums. We will study the various museological traditions that engage identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, heritage museums, art museums, and other museums of culture. Some of the questions we will ask include: what are museums for and who are they for? how do museums shape identity? and how do the various types of museums relate to one another? Our primary work will be to examine a variety of contemporary examples around the world with visits to local museums including the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.103 (02)Early Modern Europe & the Wider WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRowe, ErinHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.103 (01)Early Modern Europe & the Wider WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRowe, ErinHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.108 (02)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.108 (01)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.108 (03)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 17HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 17HIST-LATAM
AS.100.103 (04)Early Modern Europe & the Wider WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRowe, ErinHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.108 (04)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.129 (01)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMoss, KennethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.103 (03)Early Modern Europe & the Wider WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRowe, ErinHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.129 (02)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMoss, KennethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.442 (01)The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to presentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, AngusGilman 308HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.100.433 (01)Free Speech and Censorship in the United StatesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJelavich, PeterShriver Hall 001HIST-US
AS.100.430 (01)Gender and Sexuality in African HistoryT 4:00PM - 6:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 308HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.424 (01)Women & Modern Chinese HistoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 308HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.180 (01)Themes and Concepts in Jewish HistoryWF 3:00PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.248 (02)Japan in the WorldMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMKim, HayangMaryland 110HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.248 (03)Japan in the WorldMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMKim, HayangMaryland 110HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.194 (02)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMason, LauraBloomberg 168
AS.100.205 (01)Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in AfricaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLarson, Pier MGilman 413HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.248 (01)Japan in the WorldMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMKim, HayangMaryland 110HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.211 (01)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, PhilipGilman 75HIST-US
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories: identities, cultures, and the politics of queer pasts in North America and Western Europe, 1900-PresentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieGilman 308HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.194 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFurstenberg, FrancoisGilman 377
AS.100.392 (01)The Art of Lying: Lie, Dissimulation, and the "Fake News" in Pre-modern EuropeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 77HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.421 (01)Sex, Law and IslamW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKhan, Naveeda, Shepard, ToddShaffer 303HIST-ASIA, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.390 (01)The Medieval Crusades: Cultural Convergence and Religious Conflict, 1000-1400MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLester, AnneGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.312 (01)The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKrichtal, AlexeyGilman 134HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.384 (01)Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDorner, ZacharyLatrobe 107HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.305 (01)Peter to Putin: SurveyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 219HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.310 (01)The French RevolutionTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMMason, LauraKrieger 308HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.349 (01)Entertaining America: Popular Culture from Blackface to BroadcastTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBacker, Sam E, Walters, RonaldGilman 75HIST-US
AS.100.395 (01)History of Global DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMLurtz, CaseyGilman 377INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.360 (01)The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the presentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.248 (04)Japan in the WorldMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMKim, HayangMaryland 110HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.375 (01)Histories of Women and the VoteTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJones, Martha SuzanneShriver Hall Board RoomHIST-US
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 17HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.495 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, ErinGilman 17
AS.100.346 (01)Soviet-American Cold WarW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 219HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.389.325 (01)Women of the Book: Female Mystics, Miracles, and Material Culture in Early Modern EuropeT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHavens, Earle Ashcroft, II.BLC MackseyGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, GRLL-FREN
AS.100.486 (01)Jim Crow in AmericaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMConnolly, Nathan DGilman 75HIST-US
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence PMergenthaler 266
AS.310.222 (01)The Religions of KoreaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKim, NuriGilman 377INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.478 (01)Japan from its PeripheriesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, HayangGilman 77HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.290 (01)Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'W 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraBloomberg 274GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.404 (01)Korea in the WorldM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, NuriGarland 97INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter ELevering ArellanoGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.194.201 (01)Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFerrario, GabrieleShriver Hall 104ISLM-ISLMST
AS.211.329 (01)Museums and IdentityTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobGilman 443GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Online: Modern European History Through Film, 1789 to 1991
AS.100.163 (85)

This course examines the history of Western Europe from the French Revolution through to the end of the Cold War. It examines such themes as revolutions and democratization, the origins of egalitarianism, the spread of secularism, the post-war reshaping and modernization of Western culture and political policies (European and otherwise), Europe's role in the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and decolonization. Films depicting key periods and events will be used to complement readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to Present
AS.100.272 (85)

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context. *This course will view films complementary to the subject but it is not considered a Film Studies course. Therefore, montages and mise-en-scene will not be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-LATAM, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US

Holy War in the Holy Land
AS.100.271 (21)

When, in the immediate aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, then-President George W. Bush referred to the U.S. war on terror as a “crusade,"" the Islamic world erupted in protest. The American media and public were stunned at how something, seemingly so distant, could trigger such a strong emotional response. Part of the problem is historiographical. Until recently, few Western historians writing about the Crusades included Arabic and Jewish sources in their analysis of the conflict. This had an almost immediate effect on the quality of information that was presented to students in American classrooms, where much of the narrative about the Crusades was Euro-centric. The basic idea behind this course is to expose students, through primary source readings, to both Christian, Muslim and Jewish perspectives on the Crusades. The course will focus on the military campaigns and their impact on the political map of the medieval Near East."

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 26/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

U.S. LGBTQ History
AS.100.261 (21)

This course examines the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, transgender people, and other sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century. In addition to classroom lectures and exercises, students will learn to record and analyze oral history interviews and conduct research at archives across Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.163 (85)Online: Modern European History Through Film, 1789 to 1991Stewart, Simone Gamali HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.272 (85)Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to PresentStewart, Simone Gamali INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-LATAM, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US
AS.100.271 (21)Holy War in the Holy LandTTh 8:00AM - 12:30PMOmerovic, AsminCroft Hall B32INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.261 (21)U.S. LGBTQ HistoryMWTh 9:00AM - 12:15PMPlaster, Joseph, Speller, Morris Elsmere LongleyGilman 413

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (04)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (01)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (03)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom Struggle
AS.060.328 (01)

Using their recorded speeches, written lectures and published writings and drawing from their biographies, this course will explore the important life work of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. We intend to upend traditional conversations about political radicalism and ethnic politics by analyzing these spokesmen associated most indelibly with black nationalism and racial integration, respectively.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Modern Paris on Film
AS.061.396 (01)

This course uses French film to examine the history of twentieth-century Paris. We will consider how filmmakers interpreted the social, political, and technological transformations that shaped Paris in the modern era, treating movies as expressions of change and means by which filmmakers comment on it. Taught in English. $50 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (02)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (01)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (02)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.293 (02)

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Caged America: Policing, Confinement, and Criminality in the "Land of the Free"
AS.100.328 (01)

This course focuses on the evolution of law enforcement practices, the history of federal and state prison systems, and the ways in which Americans have understood and reacted to crime.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Reading through Things: Early Modern Chinese Medicine, Technology, and Art
AS.100.331 (01)

This course introduces the history of late imperial China from the perspective of medicine, technology, and the arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

The history of China from the last years of the Qing Empire to the post-Mao reforms.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (04)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold War
AS.100.130 (01)

Focus on Stalin, Khrushchev/ Truman-Eisenhower period but includes Brezhnev-Nixon. 2 sides of cold war, write 6 journals of 300 words, 2 papers of 1200 words, 2 quizzes, no midterm or final.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Freshman Seminar: The Power and Politics of Clothing in American History
AS.100.155 (01)

In this course, students will explore the power and meanings imputed to clothing and appearances, and how clothing and appearances were politicized over last three centuries of American history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: Displacement: A History of U.S. Cities from Urban Renewal to Gentrification
AS.100.140 (01)

“Displacement” explores historical conflicts over urban planning, clearance, and redevelopment. Students will conduct archival research and contribute to an online exhibit that develops the histories of displaced Baltimore neighborhoods.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (03)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: In the Land of Others: Minorities in the Pre-Modern Mediterranean
AS.100.135 (01)

This course examines the history of ethno-religious minorities in the Mediterranean during the Later Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-AFRICA

Freshman Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe
AS.100.131 (01)

This course will discuss the centrality of gender, sexuality, and gendered rhetoric to the genesis and development of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation in Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.402 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin America
AS.215.309 (01)

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin America. It brings together archeology, ethno-history, art history, literature and environmental studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (02)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Korean History Through Film and Literature
AS.310.322 (01)

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory. Prior coursework in East Asian Studies strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (02)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/6
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/33
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (01)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies, with attention to the literature, film, culture, history, and politics of black life in the United States. Our reading list will likely include texts by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Korean History and Culture
AS.310.106 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (02)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Expansion and the Early U.S. Republic
AS.100.238 (01)

This course will introduce students to some major issues and problems in the history of the Early U.S. Republic, c. 1750 to 1815, by focusing on the theme of “expansion.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (01)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Coffee and Calico: Global Commerce in the Age of Revolution
AS.100.223 (01)

Using commodities, spaces, and material culture, this course explores the rise of globalization and its impact on France over the course of the eighteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Bones, Blood, and Ecstasy: Religious Culture in Western Christendom, 1100-1700
AS.100.230 (01)

Explores religious culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with an emphasis on spiritual beliefs and practices, relics, miracles, pilgrimage, and saint-making. Emphasis on reading and discussing written sources and visual culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

A Comparative History of Jewish and Christian Mysticism
AS.100.273 (01)

This course will trace the historical development of Jewish and Christian mysticism between the 11th and the 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations
AS.100.258 (01)

This course provides a historical and theoretical overview regarding thinking about marriage. Students will think critically about how matrimony has changed over time, and marriage in contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/14
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We will explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its position within Europe and the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800
AS.100.291 (01)

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge and a profession in the early modern period? The answers lie in the histories of disease, empire, and global commerce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The shorthand “1968” stands for rebels and revolutions, but also for incremental changes throughout the 1960s that fundamentally changed the post-war order and the Cold War in East and West.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages
AS.100.374 (01)

Examines case-studies of imperial conquests (Islamic, Mongol, reconquista, early colonialism) and attendant changes in religion (Christianization; Islamization) and in language (Arabization; transition from Latin to European vernaculars) across medieval Eurasia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE

Biography, Black history and the Recreation of Early 20th Century Baltimore Neighborhoods: The Case of Billie Holiday
AS.100.440 (01)

This is an archival, original research course using the tools of microhistory and biography to etch a 1920s social history of the city centered on two corridors, East Baltimore’s Dallas Street and West Baltimore’s Pennsylvania Avenue. Our evidence consists primarily of block-level maps, the census, newspaper articles, property records and city directories. Permission of instructor strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.494 (01)

A two-semester coordinating seminar for history majors writing senior honors theses. Admission is granted by instructor only after the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor. AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the Present
AS.100.371 (01)

Jewish history, politics, and culture across a century of enormous transformations and transformative enormities in Europe, the US, and the Middle East. Topics include: impacts on Jewish life of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the post-imperial reordering of the Eastern Europe and the Middle East; Zionism and other modes of Jewish contestatory politics; the consolidation of American Jewry; Nazism and the Holocaust in Europe; formation and development of the State of Israel; the global reordering of Jewish life amid cross-currents of the Cold War, conflict in the Middle East, and success in the US. Substantial attention to recent and contemporary history including the dramatic changes in Israeli society and polity over the past forty years and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US

Migrants and Refugees in Africa
AS.100.444 (01)

A history of forced and voluntary migration and displacement in Africa, its causes and consequences, with a focus on refugees and labor migrants since 1960.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Crime, Punishment, Felony and Freedom: Law and Society in Pre-Modern England
AS.100.373 (01)

Using legal texts as a window into English society, we will address the changing nature of royal power, trial by jury, treason, felony, and the freedoms enshrined in the Magna Carta.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.293 (01)

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Multiethnic Japan
AS.100.423 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the intertwined histories of race, ethnicity, and empire in Japan and its former colonies from the early twentieth century to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective
AS.100.376 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin America
AS.100.391 (01)

This class invites students to examine changing legal cultures in a discussion- and primary-source-based environment, and through the lens of Latin America's political history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-CP, POLI-AP

Freshman Seminar: From Rabbis to Revolutionaries: Modern Jewish Identities
AS.211.217 (01)

Many Jews in the modern period abandoned the traditional religious way of life, but continued to identify strongly as Jews, and even those who remained committed to tradition had to adapt. Through the prism of the Yiddish language, the vernacular of Eastern European Jewry, this course will explore different ways in which Jews reacted to historical developments and embraced political and cultural movements of their time, from the founding of modern Yiddish theater in Romania, to the creation of a Jewish autonomous region in the far east of the Soviet Union, to the development of avant-garde poetry in New York. In addition to studying a wide range of texts—including fiction, poetry, memoir, song, and film—students will learn how to read the Yiddish alphabet, and will explore food culture by preparing a meal of Eastern European Jewish dishes. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is necessary for this course

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Age of Tolstoy
AS.100.361 (01)

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE

Casanova and the Enlightenment
AS.100.351 (01)

This course will discuss the Age of the Enlightenment in light of the writings of the famous adventurer, Giacomo Casanova.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (04)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (06)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 23/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (05)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Heaven on Earth: Art, Power, and Wonder in the Vatican from Antiquity to the Enlightenment
AS.389.357 (01)

A material cultural exploration of the Vatican from the founding of St. Peter’s basilica in antiquity to the establishment of the Vatican Library and Museums in the Renaissance and Enlightenment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th Centuries
AS.140.314 (01)

This course traces the history of human subjects research as a medical and scientific practice. It will focus on the human subjects themselves, and how their experiences intersect with the histories of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dictatorship, Dissidence and Democracy: Central Europe in the 20th Century
AS.191.333 (01)

Central Europe in the second half of the twentieth century was ground zero in the Cold War, as well as in the battle of ideas that accompanied it. In this course, we will first examine the theory of communism and the practice of Stalinism in the region; then seek to understand the tactics of dissent and the ideas behind it; and finally focus on the collapse of communist in 1989 and the struggle to “democratize” the region in the decade that followed. Over the course of the semester we will examine the relationship between political ideology and everyday life, seeking to understand what big concepts like ‘democracy’ and ‘dictatorship’ really meant for ordinary people from Warsaw and Tallinn to Budapest and East Berlin. We will also discuss Soviet, American and, in the latter part of the course, Russian foreign policy, with special emphasis on outsiders’ use of propaganda and violence to affect political change in the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Ancient Egypt /Africa
AS.130.328 (01)

Recent excavation and research have shed light on several ancient cultures of the Nile and its tributaries. We will look at the available archaeological and textual (all Egyptian) evidence for these societies and their interactions with Egypt between 3500 and 300 B.C. We will also discuss research aims and methods employed now and in the past in Egypt and the Sudan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/19
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Historiography Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 31/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (04)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (01)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (03)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.060.328 (01)Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom StruggleTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence PMaryland 217ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.061.396 (01)Modern Paris on FilmTh 3:00PM - 5:20PM, W 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsMason, LauraGilman 17FILM-CRITST
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (02)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.113 (01)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWalters, RonaldOlin 305HIST-US
AS.100.113 (02)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWalters, RonaldOlin 305HIST-US
AS.100.293 (02)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 75
AS.100.328 (01)Caged America: Policing, Confinement, and Criminality in the "Land of the Free"TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMShahan, Morgan JGilman 400HIST-US
AS.100.331 (01)Reading through Things: Early Modern Chinese Medicine, Technology, and ArtTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMJi, XiaoqianGilman 413HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 132INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.113 (04)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWalters, RonaldOlin 305HIST-US
AS.100.130 (01)Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold WarTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 186HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.155 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Power and Politics of Clothing in American HistoryTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMTemplier, SarahGilman 413HIST-US
AS.100.140 (01)Freshman Seminar: Displacement: A History of U.S. Cities from Urban Renewal to GentrificationTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpeller, Morris Elsmere LongleyGilman 305HIST-US
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLarson, Pier MGilman 17HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.113 (03)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWalters, RonaldOlin 305HIST-US
AS.100.135 (01)Freshman Seminar: In the Land of Others: Minorities in the Pre-Modern MediterraneanTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGlazer-Eytan, YonatanRemsen Hall 1HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.131 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter Reformation EuropeTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMKeene, Jessica LynnGilman 413HIST-EUROPE
AS.310.402 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 306INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.215.309 (01)An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraSmokler Center 213GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.211.265 (02)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.310.322 (01)Korean History Through Film and LiteratureW 4:00PM - 6:20PMKim, NuriGreenhouse 113INST-GLOBAL
AS.214.479 (02)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoBloomberg 278INST-CP
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaGilman 55
AS.310.106 (01)Introduction to Korean History and CultureTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKim, NuriMaryland 217INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.170 (02)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.238 (01)Expansion and the Early U.S. RepublicMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMFurstenberg, FrancoisGilman 219HIST-US
AS.100.170 (01)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.223 (01)Coffee and Calico: Global Commerce in the Age of RevolutionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWaxman, RachelShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.230 (01)Bones, Blood, and Ecstasy: Religious Culture in Western Christendom, 1100-1700TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, ErinHodson 311HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.273 (01)A Comparative History of Jewish and Christian MysticismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 277HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.258 (01)Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present ConsiderationsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Lauren BGilman 313HIST-US
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.291 (01)Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDorner, ZacharyGilman 377HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethMudd 26INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.497 (01)The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 377HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.374 (01)Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, TamerGilman 10INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.440 (01)Biography, Black history and the Recreation of Early 20th Century Baltimore Neighborhoods: The Case of Billie HolidayW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 413HIST-US
AS.100.494 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 3:50PMRowe, ErinKrieger 178
AS.100.371 (01)Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the PresentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethGilman 308INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US
AS.100.444 (01)Migrants and Refugees in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 400HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.100.373 (01)Crime, Punishment, Felony and Freedom: Law and Society in Pre-Modern EnglandMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLester, AnneGilman 219HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.293 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMEl-leithy, TamerGilman 377
AS.100.423 (01)Multiethnic JapanTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, HayangGilman 313HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.376 (01)The Haitian Revolution in Global PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGaffield, Meredith MichelleGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.391 (01)Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin AmericaTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCaso Bello, AlvaroAmes 234HIST-LATAM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-CP, POLI-AP
AS.211.217 (01)Freshman Seminar: From Rabbis to Revolutionaries: Modern Jewish IdentitiesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLang, BeatriceGilman 443GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.100.361 (01)Age of TolstoyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 219INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.351 (01)Casanova and the EnlightenmentTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszBloomberg 178HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WKrieger 178INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (04)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (06)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKingsley, Jennifer PShriver Hall 104HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH
AS.140.105 (05)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.389.357 (01)Heaven on Earth: Art, Power, and Wonder in the Vatican from Antiquity to the EnlightenmentT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHavens, Earle Ashcroft, II.BLC MackseyGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.140.314 (01)Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th CenturiesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMNuriddin, AyahGilman 300
AS.191.333 (01)Dictatorship, Dissidence and Democracy: Central Europe in the 20th CenturyStaff INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.328 (01)Ancient Egypt /AfricaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130GARCH-ARCH
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TGilman 77INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityT 1:30PM - 4:30PMShepard, ToddBloomberg 272