Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Writing Systems of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.302 (01)

This course explores writing as both technology and social process. It surveys several Indigenous writing and notational systems of the Americas, focusing in particular on Maya glyphic script. In this class, students will learn to “read” Maya script, interpret complex artistic programs and decipher numbers, dates and names of historical figures. The course will also discuss the ways in which archaeology can inform or unsettle written narratives, with implications for approaching contested histories today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Blood, Gold, and Souls: The Arts of the Spanish Empire
AS.010.325 (01)

From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, visual forms and practices linked such far-flung places as Mexico City and Naples, Manila and Lima, Cuzco and Antwerp, Quito and Madrid: all cities in the Spanish Empire. This course is conceived as a voyage, moving city by city to explore objects that connected Spain’s vast holdings. We will investigate how the Spanish Crown and the Catholic Church used visual strategies to consolidate political power and instill religious faith across the world; and, alternatively, we will consider how local conditions, concerns, and resistance reshaped those efforts. This course surveys a diverse range of artistic production: religious paintings and sculptures; maps used for imperial surveillance; luxury goods crafted from shimmering feathers, ceramics, ivory, and precious metals; urban design and architecture from the ports of Europe to the highland outposts of the Andes; ephemeral cityscapes for civic performances. In examining such materials, students will be introduced to the art historical methods and theoretical concerns used to study a wide diversity of objects within an imperial frame.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hyman, Aaron M.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Politics of Memoir
AS.060.361 (01)

This course explores the interlocking political and historical dimensions of personal experience, an account of ourselves and our relations (“the quest for competitive advantage between groups, individuals, or societies”) that points us in the direction of what “is ‘common’ to the whole community.” What does it mean for people who are not the chief actors or theoreticians of political movements to construe the record of their experience as an act of political intervention, an aid in our total understanding of the structure of popular belief and behavior? Furthermore, what happens when attempt to historicize and critique these recorded experiences? The class asks its members to focus closely on an episode of autobiographical experience as both an historical fossil and tangible politicized moment, particularly the places where race, gender and economic power are visible. By producing a “critical discourse of everyday life—by turning residual, untheorized everyday experience into communicable experience… one can reframe ostensibly private and individual experiences in terms of a collective struggle.” To help our investigation we will read and analyze closely memoirs, many of them from the African American experience. We function partly as a writers’ workshop and partly as a critical review. The final goal of the seminar is a polished 20-25 page autobiographical essay.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.130 (03)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Philip
  • Room: Bloomberg 478
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: The Politics of the Future
AS.100.130 (04)

This course explores visions of the technological future in literature, film, and social thought in the twentieth-century United States. Topics include the political implications of television, automation, artificial intelligence, globalization, and the internet.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (01)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (02)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (03)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (04)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in Culture
AS.100.235 (01)

This course examines how Asians and Asian Americans became racialized in U.S. law from the early twentieth century through today. Topics include immigration, U.S. empire in Asia, food, and activism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Chua, Jilene Chan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (01)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (02)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (03)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (04)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

Ideas and concepts on colonialism and globalization are reconsidered and refined in this course on the study of early modern Iberian expansion in Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle East
AS.100.262 (01)

The course examines religious difference in the medieval Middle East, including the policies of different Islamic states towards non-Muslims; conversion to Islam and Islamization of society; apostasy and martyrdom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, the welfare state, the arms race, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration and the EU. We will cover academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Passing in American Culture
AS.100.275 (01)

This course explores passing narratives – stories that feature people who cross race, class, ethnic, or gender boundaries. We will consider what passing narratives can teach us about power and identity, especially as power is presumed to reside in the self and race is presumed to no longer matter.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories introduces students to the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of LGBTQ+-identified subjects and communities in the US and Western Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Bloomberg 478
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Revolucionarios! Social Movements and Radical Politics from the Spanish Empire to the Catalan Crisis
AS.100.292 (01)

This course examines different radical movement such as anarchism, communism, fascism, nationalism and feminism in the context of the Hispanic world from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first century. Course is in English. No Spanish required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Regue Sendros, Oriol
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.294 (01)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Furstenberg, Francois
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.294 (02)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Peter to Putin: Survey
AS.100.305 (01)

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

History of American Reproductive Politics
AS.100.319 (01)

This course examines reproductive politics in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Topics include contraception, abortion, and sterilization, emphasizing the impact of gender, class, and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lansing, Caitlin Brooke
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, MSCH-HUM

American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016
AS.100.337 (01)

A history of American foreign relations from 1914-2016. The course focuses on the American creation of an international liberal order and the challenges to that international order.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Delehanty, Sean T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Soviet-American Cold War
AS.100.346 (01)

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/23
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is our key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes in public, and international competitions and how Cold War sports relate to race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Israel and Palestine from 1967 to the Present: a Current and Entangled History
AS.100.409 (01)

Through intensive and extensive reading, we will explore contemporary Israeli society, politics, and culture, contemporary Palestinian society, politics, and culture under occupation, and the historical processes that have shaped both societies and their ongoing entanglement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Telling Japanese Histories
AS.100.443 (01)

This advanced-level seminar explores the political, social, and intellectual concerns that have both shaped and undermined dominant ways of telling Japanese history, especially in Japan and the U.S. since 1945.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

History Research Lab
AS.100.450 (02)

This hands-on course will use historical data and archival material to build a public facing digital atlas of rural Mexico at the end of the nineteenth century. We’ll learn to work with ArcGIS and other platforms, collaborate with scholars in Mexico, and learn about the history of cartography and information technology. Spanish language skills helpful but not required, no programming or GIS background needed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.495 (01)

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Law, Ritual, and Society: The Making of Biblical Israel
AS.130.221 (01)

Stories of conflict over religion and law proliferate in contemporary American news media. Perhaps even more frequent in recent years are the stories from the Middle East concerning attempts at using law to advance a particular religious agenda. Such patterns are ubiquitous throughout human history. While the circumstances and details vary, law and ritual always shape human societies in remarkable ways. In this course, we will examine the ways in which societies utilize law and ritual to shape social values, customs, and perspectives. We will study law and ritual not simply as cultural artifacts, but as ideological tools used by individuals and groups to advance agendas, compel behaviors, and otherwise influence such social forces as power, status, gender, and resources. We will use ancient Israel as our test case. The texts of the Hebrew Bible offer us a view into a long history of focus on both law and ritual within one society. These texts were preserved because they were socially useful in a variety of contexts. Yet, the long history of legal and ritual texts in the Hebrew Bible also gives us insight into how such traditions evolve and change in different social conditions. While law and ritual may shape society, they are likewise often shaped by it. Students should be able to take these broad considerations from ancient Israel and apply them to other social settings in both discussion and writing by the end of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Church, Gregory Paul
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

History of Public Health in East Asia
AS.140.146 (01)

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level:
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hanson, Marta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Democracy
AS.196.311 (02)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (03)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Shaffer 2
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (04)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Dante's Journey through the Afterlife
AS.211.479 (01)

Dante's Divine Comedy presents a complete picture of the medieval world-view in all its aspects: physical (the structure of the cosmos), historical (the major actors from Adam to Dante himself) and moral (a complete system of right and wrong). Dante shows how the Christian religion portrayed itself, other religions, the nature of God, humans, angels and devils, and human society. We will explore these topics both from the viewpoint of Dante's own time, and in terms of its relevance to our own societal and cultural concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dante's Journey through the Afterlife
AS.211.479 (02)

Dante's Divine Comedy presents a complete picture of the medieval world-view in all its aspects: physical (the structure of the cosmos), historical (the major actors from Adam to Dante himself) and moral (a complete system of right and wrong). Dante shows how the Christian religion portrayed itself, other religions, the nature of God, humans, angels and devils, and human society. We will explore these topics both from the viewpoint of Dante's own time, and in terms of its relevance to our own societal and cultural concerns.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The History and Culture of North Korea
AS.310.323 (01)

This course investigates the history and culture of North Korea. In doing so, the class seeks to address topics not often discussed in the media and eschew a focus on international relations and security issues. Course material include conventional scholarship, political tracts, biographies, movies, as well as works of fiction. For the final project, students will write a research paper on a topic of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Queer Sixties
AS.389.220 (01)

Introduction to queer & trans politics and culture in the period immediately preceding the gay liberation movement, from the early to late 1960s, focusing on intersections of race, sexuality, and gender. Course examines how we have come to narrate queer & trans history and investigates the ways archival practices shape conceptions of queer & trans life. Students learn research methods as they draw on and contribute to the university’s digitized archival collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.302 (01)Writing Systems of the Ancient AmericasTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRossi, Franco HART-ANC
AS.010.325 (01)Blood, Gold, and Souls: The Arts of the Spanish EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHyman, Aaron M. 
AS.060.361 (01)The Politics of MemoirTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Lawrence P ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.100.130 (03)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, PhilipBloomberg 478HIST-US
AS.100.130 (04)Freshman Seminar: The Politics of the FutureM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, AngusGilman 132HIST-US
AS.100.165 (01)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (02)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (03)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (04)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.235 (01)Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMChua, Jilene Chan HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (01)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (02)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (03)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (04)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, Francis INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.262 (01)Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle EastMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, Tamer HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShaffer 3HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.275 (01)Passing in American CultureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani T HIST-US
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieBloomberg 478HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.292 (01)Revolucionarios! Social Movements and Radical Politics from the Spanish Empire to the Catalan CrisisTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRegue Sendros, OriolGilman 50INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL
AS.100.294 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMFurstenberg, Francois 
AS.100.294 (02)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHindmarch-Watson, Katie 
AS.100.305 (01)Peter to Putin: SurveyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey P HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.319 (01)History of American Reproductive PoliticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLansing, Caitlin Brooke HIST-US, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.337 (01)American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDelehanty, Sean T HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.346 (01)Soviet-American Cold WarT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey P HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaRowe, William T HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethMergenthaler 111HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.409 (01)Israel and Palestine from 1967 to the Present: a Current and Entangled HistoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMoss, Kenneth HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John W INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.443 (01)Telling Japanese HistoriesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.450 (02)History Research LabT 3:00PM - 5:30PMLurtz, Casey HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.495 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, ErinBloomberg 168
AS.130.221 (01)Law, Ritual, and Society: The Making of Biblical IsraelWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMChurch, Gregory Paul NEAS-HISCUL
AS.140.146 (01)History of Public Health in East AsiaMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMHanson, Marta INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffKrieger 205INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.311 (02)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, YaschaAmes 234INST-CP
AS.196.311 (03)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, YaschaShaffer 2INST-CP
AS.196.311 (04)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, YaschaMaryland 201INST-CP
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, PeterShaffer 303INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.479 (01)Dante's Journey through the AfterlifeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.211.479 (02)Dante's Journey through the AfterlifeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.310.323 (01)The History and Culture of North KoreaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence P ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.389.220 (01)Queer SixtiesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPlaster, Joseph PMUS-INTRO