Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

American Dreams: The Middle Class in U.S. History
AS.100.232 (01)

Why does so much of America consider itself middle class? And how did we get that way? “American Dreams” traces that history from 19th century elites to 20th century suburbia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Backer, Sam E
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

French Masculinities
AS.061.397 (01)

Examines changing ideals of masculinity in France after 1960 as they found expression on film, rooting the work of iconic stars and directors in their cultural, political and historical contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Pop History from King Arthur to Game of Thrones
AS.100.242 (01)

This course explores the use of history for cultural & political purposes in the Anglo-American world from 1500-today. Students will examine how real and imaginary histories have functioned as political propaganda, catalysts of national identity, and weapons in culture wars. The course draws on a range of media, including text, YouTube, video games, podcasts, and movies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Megerian, Jonathan Ryan
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

In this class we focus on such topics as the transatlantic alliance, the Cold War divide, the arms race, détente, migration, European integration and the EU from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/45
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and unmaking queer histories introduces students to some of the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of past queer lives and communities in the United States and Western Europe since the nineteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.294 (01)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.294 (02)

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (01)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (02)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (03)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (04)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Peter to Putin: Survey
AS.100.305 (01)

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Rise and the Fall of the Modern City: An Environmental History Perspective
AS.100.318 (01)

This course explores how environmental history analyzes the transformations of cities in the West from 1750 to the early 2000s. An emphasis will be placed on historiographical debates and concepts, but also on agency and relations of power. The course also analyze how the environment is a construct, a production of discourses, representations, and debates.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: de Font-Reaulx, Constance Marie Anne
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The Domestic Slave Trade in Antebellum America
AS.100.322 (01)

An introduction to the domestic slave trade of the 19th century United States. Topics will include the scale of the trade, its impact on enslaved families and redistributive justice/reparations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Jennie Katherine
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making Money in the Atlantic World
AS.100.333 (01)

The history of money is a history of power exercised by states, institutions, and individuals. It is also a history of the structural possibilities and constraints faced by people in the past. We will address making, using, and conceptualizing money in the early modern Atlantic World, a time and a place of expanding empires, extractive enterprises, and changing categories of difference like race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dorner, Zachary
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

The American West
AS.100.335 (01)

This course explores the expansion and creation of an American West—and its inhabitants—from the Constitution to the end of the nineteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

The American West
AS.100.335 (02)

This course explores the expansion and creation of an American West—and its inhabitants—from the Constitution to the end of the nineteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

The United Kingdom? A Cultural History of Four Nations, 1707-Present
AS.100.336 (01)

This course delves into the variegated, often divergent national politics, social landscapes, and cultural shifts in England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland since Britain’s Acts of Union in 1707.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Holocaust in Jewish History and in Global Culture
AS.100.415 (01)

Key works on the history of Nazi Germany’s murder of European Jewry during the Second World War; Jewish responses; the recasting of Jewish and global thought in relation to this signal event; genocide and ‘ethnic cleansing’ since the Holocaust.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.495 (01)

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness
AS.100.354 (01)

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World
AS.194.201 (01)

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the Present
AS.100.371 (01)

Jewish history, politics, and culture across a century of enormous transformations and transformative enormities in Europe, the US, and the Middle East. Topics include: impacts on Jewish life of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the post-imperial reordering of the Eastern Europe and the Middle East; Zionism and other modes of Jewish contestatory politics; the consolidation of American Jewry; Nazism and the Holocaust in Europe; formation and development of the State of Israel; the global reordering of Jewish life amid cross-currents of the Cold War, conflict in the Middle East, and success in the US. Substantial attention to recent and contemporary history including the dramatic changes in Israeli society and polity over the past forty years and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

Writing Power, or Dueling in Print with Light Sabers: An RIC Seminar on Scholarly Composition
AS.100.490 (01)

A first-of-its kind seminar hosted by the Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship, this course explores the practice of composition for professional writers. It considers the “light” and “dark” sides of clear, direct scholarly writing and intentional, academic obfuscation, respectively. Attendees will also learn strategies and potential hazards that accompany the written description of power in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, Nathan D
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800

The Religions of Korea
AS.310.222 (01)

This course offers an overview of the religions of Korea, both indigenous and foreign, old and new. Attention will be paid to the history of these religions, their impact on society, as well as their teachings and objectives. Students will engage with various forms of secondary as well as primary sources including scriptures, sermons, and religious tracts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room: Mattin Center 160
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Themes and Concepts in Jewish History
AS.100.369 (01)

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography from the 19th century to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

History 100.365 will consist of two lectures a week and one discussion section. Readings focus when possible on primary sources. It will cover the social, economic, political and intellectual development of medieval society, beginning with the rise of feudal society, the development of medieval courtly culture, primarily the creation of epic and romance literature in the various courts of Europe; the creation of universities and the intellectual revival of Europe in the form of scholasticism; the re-emergence of trade and, with it, the rise of a middle class, the political development of royal authority which was tantamount to the creation of the modern national state and finally, the emergence of heresy and new forms of spirituality in the late Middle Ages to combat it, especially with the creation of the Dominican and Franciscan monastic orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

History 100.365 will consist of two lectures a week and one discussion section. Readings focus when possible on primary sources. It will cover the social, economic, political and intellectual development of medieval society, beginning with the rise of feudal society, the development of medieval courtly culture, primarily the creation of epic and romance literature in the various courts of Europe; the creation of universities and the intellectual revival of Europe in the form of scholasticism; the re-emergence of trade and, with it, the rise of a middle class, the political development of royal authority which was tantamount to the creation of the modern national state and finally, the emergence of heresy and new forms of spirituality in the late Middle Ages to combat it, especially with the creation of the Dominican and Franciscan monastic orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Age of Reason on the Silver Screen: Cinematic Representations of the Enlightenment
AS.100.377 (01)

This course will discuss the problem of historical representation on the basis of an analysis of movies depicting the Age of the Enlightenment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL

Queer & Trans Public History
AS.389.230 (01)

This course introduces students to a blend of public history, queer studies and transgender studies. Students learn oral history and archival research methods as they draw on and contribute to the university’s archival, museum, and library collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.126 (01)

A basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/100
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Introduction to Africana Studies
AS.362.112 (01)

This course introduces students to the field of Africana Studies. It focuses on the historical experience, intellectual ideas, theories, and cultural production of African-descended people. We will consider how people of the black diaspora remember and encounter Africa. We will explore, too, how such people have lived, spoken, written, and produced art about colonialism and enslavement, gender and mobility, violence and pleasure. This course will be thematically organized and invite you to center your own stories about black people within your understanding of the modern world and its making.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Soviet-American Cold War
AS.100.346 (01)

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes and international competitions and how sports relate to race, gender, and class. We will discuss the ways in which sports confirm and consolidate but also challenge and change social structures and opportunities of self-fulfillment and social advancement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Histories of Women and the Vote
AS.100.375 (01)

The year 2020 will mark 100 years since the 19th Amendment guaranteed American women the right to vote. Or did it? This course will examine the long history of women’s voting rights in the United States, including the story that extends from a convention at Seneca Falls, NY to a constitutional amendment. It will also examine alternative stories, especially those of women of color whose campaigns for the vote did not end in 1920 – and continue until today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jones, Martha Suzanne
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Interpreting Hopkins as Historic Site
AS.389.275 (01)

This hands-on course explores interpretive strategies for historic sites and culminates in the production of original, research-based, outdoor interpretive exhibits on the Homewood Campus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: BLC Macksey
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.232 (01)American Dreams: The Middle Class in U.S. HistoryTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMBacker, Sam EShaffer 304HIST-US
AS.061.397 (01)French MasculinitiesT 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsMason, LauraLatrobe 120FILM-CRITST
AS.100.242 (01)Pop History from King Arthur to Game of ThronesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMegerian, Jonathan RyanKrieger LavertyHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShaffer 100HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHindmarch-Watson, KatieShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.294 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMEl-leithy, TamerMudd 26
AS.100.294 (02)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMThornberry, ElizabethKrieger 302
AS.100.295 (01)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (02)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (03)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (04)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.305 (01)Peter to Putin: SurveyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.318 (01)The Rise and the Fall of the Modern City: An Environmental History PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMde Font-Reaulx, Constance Marie AnneBloomberg 276HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.100.322 (01)The Domestic Slave Trade in Antebellum AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMWilliams, Jennie KatherineBloomberg 178HIST-US
AS.100.333 (01)Making Money in the Atlantic WorldTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMDorner, ZacharyHodson 110HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.335 (01)The American WestMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWalters, RonaldGilman 55HIST-US
AS.100.335 (02)The American WestMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWalters, RonaldGilman 55HIST-US
AS.100.336 (01)The United Kingdom? A Cultural History of Four Nations, 1707-PresentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieGilman 186HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 413HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TGilman 308INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.415 (01)The Holocaust in Jewish History and in Global CultureT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethMaryland 114HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.495 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, Erin 
AS.100.354 (01)Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing WhitenessTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani THodson 316HIST-US
AS.194.201 (01)Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval WorldMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, GabrieleHodson 216ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TKrieger 170HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.371 (01)Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the PresentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethGilman 308INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.490 (01)Writing Power, or Dueling in Print with Light Sabers: An RIC Seminar on Scholarly CompositionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, Nathan DKrieger 306
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStephens, Walter EGilman 132GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800
AS.310.222 (01)The Religions of KoreaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKim, NuriMattin Center 160INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 75INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.369 (01)Themes and Concepts in Jewish HistoryMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.377 (01)The Age of Reason on the Silver Screen: Cinematic Representations of the EnlightenmentT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL
AS.389.230 (01)Queer & Trans Public HistoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPlaster, JosephSmokler Center 213PMUS-INTRO
AS.130.126 (01)Gods and Monsters in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardOlin 305ARCH-RELATE
AS.362.112 (01)Introduction to Africana StudiesWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, Shani TShaffer 300
AS.100.346 (01)Soviet-American Cold WarT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.375 (01)Histories of Women and the VoteM 1:30PM - 4:00PMJones, Martha SuzanneAmes 218HIST-US
AS.389.275 (01)Interpreting Hopkins as Historic SiteT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer PBLC MackseyPMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE