Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Netherlandish Painting in the Fifteenth Century: Broederlam to Bosch
AS.010.245 (01)

Explores the achievements and impact of the major painters working in the Burgundian Netherlands, especially the cities of Flanders, during the fifteenth century: Melchior Broederlam, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden; the Master of Flémalle, Hans Memling, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Merback, Mitchell
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, HART-MED

Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic World
AS.010.330 (01)

Despite its modern-day association with a fringe extremist movement, the term “caliphate” was traditionally used to describe the Muslim world at large, the political and spiritual ruler of which bore the title of caliph. The original Islamic caliphate was established in the seventh century as a vast empire centered on the Middle East and extending deep into Africa, Asia, and Europe. It soon broke apart into a series of competing powers, until in the tenth century, three rival dynasties—the Baghdad-based Abbasids, the Spanish Umayyads, and the Fatimids of North Africa—each claimed to be the rightful caliphate. This course will examine how these fascinating political developments and conflicts played out in the realm of art and architecture between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. As well as palaces, mosques, and commemorative buildings, the course will look at media ranging from ceramics and metalwork to textiles and illustrated manuscripts, with many of the artifacts being viewed firsthand in local museum collections. These works will be considered in relation to such themes as patronage, audience, ceremony, and meaning. Particular attention will be paid to how the various caliphates—both in emulation of and competition with one another—used visual culture as a powerful tool to assert their legitimacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED

Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century Germany
AS.010.336 (01)

Since the publication of Giorgio Vasari’s Lives (1550), in which the history of art was first conceived as the successive accomplishment of a select group of great men, the discipline of Art History has had a gender problem. Today, feminist scholars continue to grapple with this troubled legacy, working to redress the masculinist biases inherent in disciplinary methods and assumptions while at the same time fighting to recover the value of traditionally overlooked subjects and genres. In the early 1990s, the history of masculinity emerged as an adjunct to traditional feminist history. Aimed at addressing misconceptions about the nature and naturalness of male identity, this subfield has helped open masculinity to critical reevaluation. Drawing on the contributions of contemporary feminist scholarship as well as those of the history of masculinity, this course explores the ways in which a reconsideration of the nature of male identity in the historical past might help us rethink key art historical issues, for example, paradigmatic notions of the Renaissance artist, the nature of copying and competition, and the concepts of creativity, invention, and genius. The course will focus on developments in the German speaking world in the late fifteenth and sixteenth-centuries; as numerous historians have noted, the German speaking lands underwent a crisis of masculinity during this period, in part precipitated by the events of the Protestant Reformation. At the same time, the region witnessed profound changes in the status of the arts and of the artist. In this course, we will explore the ways in which these phenomena were related, and how they contributed to culturally specific notions of the relationship between masculinity and artistry. We will also consider the ways in which a close examination of masculinity in the German Renaissance opens up new avenues of art historical and cultural historical investigation with relevance beyond the period itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stolurow, Benjamin Isaac
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman Empire
AS.010.465 (01)

Designed from the outset to be inhabited and used, works of architecture are inherently susceptible to changes in purpose, appearance, and meaning over time. This was particularly so in the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299–1922), a multiethnic and multireligious transcontinental polity whose territories were already marked by long and eventful architectural histories. Through such case studies as the Parthenon in Athens, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople/Istanbul, the Citadel of Cairo, and the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, this course investigates the ways in which buildings and sites have been appropriated, repurposed, transformed, and/or reconceptualized in response to changing sociopolitical and artistic conditions. Topics to be addressed include the conversion of places of worship, (re)decoration as a vehicle of ideology, and the phenomenon of spoliation—the recycling, whether for practical or symbolic reasons, of existing building materials. In addition to the monuments themselves, we will address the objects that filled them and the human activities they hosted. While our focus will be on the Ottoman context and its relationship to the past, the course will also consider comparable examples in other geographies as well as developments in the post-Ottoman era, including the current debate over the Parthenon marbles and the recent reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Modern Paris on Film
AS.061.396 (01)

This course uses French film to examine the history of twentieth-century Paris. We will consider how filmmakers interpreted the social, political, and technological transformations that shaped Paris in the modern era, treating movies as expressions of change and means by which filmmakers comment on it. Taught in English. $50 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM, W 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Introduction to the Middle East
AS.100.118 (01)

This introductory course aims to introduce students who have no prior knowledge of the Middle East to the region. Emphasis will be placed on the history, geography, languages, religions, and culture of the pre-modern and modern Middle East. Students will also be exposed to different methods and approaches to the academic study of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Noor, Rao Mohsin Ali
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (01)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Shaffer 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (02)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Shaffer 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

The 1619 Project: History and Public Debate
AS.100.210 (01)

We will discuss Nikole Hannah-Jones’s 1619 Project, the scholarship supporting each of the essays, and the public debates that ensued. Students will learn how authors build historical arguments and develop critical reading and fact-checking skills. The class will balance a deep investigation of the Project’s essays with an analysis of how those essays have influenced political discourse. This is a reading-intensive, discussion-based class. There will be two small writing assignments, including a final project which can take the form of a podcast, blog post, video, or other multi-media format beyond a traditional essay. The goal is for students to be able to communicate their expertise to people outside the classroom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Smaldone, Gregory J
  • Room: Wyman Park N105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US

Paris Noire: Black American Women in the City of Lights
AS.100.218 (01)

This class explores the construction and articulation of Black womanhood between the anglophone and francophone worlds in the 19th and 20th century. Through a study of secondary and primary sources, we will follow African American women across the Atlantic and analyze their experiences with France and the French language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pilatte, Malaurie Jacqueline
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Changing the World: Philanthropy in the Twentieth Century
AS.100.228 (01)

This course introduces students to significant ideas and debates on the appropriate role of private individuals, institutions, and wealth in leading social change from the Gilded Age through Silicon Valley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Taylor S
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Islam East of the Middle East: The Interconnected Histories of Islam in Asia
AS.100.245 (01)

Challenging the conception that Islam is synonymous with the Middle East, this course considers Muslim populations across Asia and interrogates how Islam and these regions have shaped one another.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Halladay, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (01)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (02)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Sex and the American City
AS.100.252 (01)

Why are cities associated with sex and vice? Are cities a natural refuge for LGBT people? This course explores the role of American cities in the history of sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Jules
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

History of Kabbalah
AS.100.256 (01)

This course is a survey of the history of Jewish magic, mysticism, and secret tradition from the Middle Ages till the 19th century. We shall explore the concept of the sod (mystery) and its historical variants. We shall read excerpts from the most important texts of Jewish esotericism, such as Sefer Yetzirah, the Bahir, and the Zohar. We shall also discuss “practical Kabbalah”, i.e. the preparation and use of amulets and charms, as well as demonic (and angelic) possession.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle East
AS.100.262 (01)

The course examines religious difference in the medieval Middle East, including everyday encounters and relations between members of different communities; the policies of some Islamic states towards non-Muslims; conversion to Islam and the Islamization of society and space.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: el-Leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Ames 320
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA

A History of Health, Healing, (Bio)Medicine, and Power in Africa
AS.100.265 (01)

This course explores how historical events and processes, such as colonialism and globalization, have shaped ideas of health, healing, medicine, and power in specific African societies since the 19th century. 100-level course in African History recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Mazzeo, Vincenza F
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, social democracy, the welfare state, the relationship to the US and the Soviet Union, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration, neoliberalism, and the EU. We will discuss and analyze academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

American Thought since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (01)

A survey of major developments in American philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory since 1865. Among other subjects, readings will explore modernism and anti-modernism, belief and uncertainty, science and tradition, uniformity and diversity, scarcity and surfeit, and individualism and concern for the social good.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Thought since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (02)

A survey of major developments in American philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory since 1865. Among other subjects, readings will explore modernism and anti-modernism, belief and uncertainty, science and tradition, uniformity and diversity, scarcity and surfeit, and individualism and concern for the social good.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Old Regime and Revolutionary France
AS.100.303 (01)

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

History of China since ca. 1900.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

African Cities: Environment, Gender, and Economic Life
AS.100.372 (01)

This class explores the geographic, economic and cultural issues resulting from Africa’s urban growth from precolonial times to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Gondola, Didier Didier
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

This class reassesses the history of the Cold War through sports. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes at home and abroad. We will discuss how sports were used in domestic and foreign policy, and how Cold War sports reinforced or challenged notions of race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA

Practicing Historical Research
AS.100.388 (01)

Students work on producing an individual research project. In certain cases, advisors may allow this requirement to be substituted with a History Research Lab course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture (literature, cinema).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM

The Gender Binary and American Empire
AS.100.396 (01)

This seminar explores how the sex and gender binary was produced through US colonialism since the nineteenth century. Topics include domestic settler colonialism, as well as Hawaii, the Caribbean, and Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Jules
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Saints, Saviors, and Sovereigns in the Early Modern World
AS.100.428 (01)

This reading intensive seminar will explore the myriad ways in which questions of sovereignty and the sacred were joined together across the early modern world. Emphasis will be placed on sacred and universal modes of kingship, saintly cults, and messianic movements amongst the Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities of the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Noor, Rao Mohsin Ali
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE

Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of Rights
AS.100.445 (01)

This seminar-style course will focus on discussing British and American political thought from the "Age of Revolutions", a period also of many critiques of Empire and of many works of Antislavery. Readings include Paine's Common Sense and Rights of Man, the Declaration of Rights, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers; works by Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; and antislavery works by Cugoano, Equiano, Rush, Wesley, and Wilberforce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/26
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Making Medieval History in 'Modern' America
AS.100.446 (01)

This course examines the emergence and practice of medieval history as a field of history in the US beginning in the nineteenth-century. We will address what the medieval past meant for the formation of the discipline of history in the US and how an imagined medieval past came to inform scholarly discourse, research approaches, methodologies, ideas about race and gender, legal and constitutional history, and the contours of nation states. The narrative of the medieval origins of states will also be addressed and questioned as it developed over the course of the 20th century. Students will do archival research in the JHU archives and in other published and unpublished source sets.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: BLC 4040
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at Hopkins
AS.100.450 (03)

It is time at Johns Hopkins University to rewrite our own history, one that takes a frank look at how race and racism have shaped the university and its community. This research seminar will build upon the recent revelations about founder Johns Hopkins, his family and their relationships to slave holding. Taught as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project, this seminar will center on new student research into the private and public records of early America, aiming to provide new insights into the nature and extent of Mr. Hopkins involvement in slavery and the lives of those Black Americans whom he held enslaved. Students will read deeply into the history of slavery, will learn new research techniques, and will publish the results of their work as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project. Students will also participate in public seminars where, alongside experts, they will bring this history to broader audiences, including the university community and residents of Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jones, Martha Suzanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

History Research Lab: Black Intellectuals in South Africa
AS.100.450 (08)

Get hands-on experience with archival material from 19th and 20th century South Africa. Together we will use newspapers and government petitions to map networks of African intellectual life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

How has the history of modern China been told by Chinese, Western, and Japanese historians and social thinkers, and how did this affect popular attitudes and government policies toward China?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.495 (01)

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Hasidism
AS.130.352 (01)

Although it appears to be a relic of pre-modern Judaism, Hasidism is a phenomenon of the modern era of Jewish history. This course surveys the political and social history of the Hasidic movement over the course of the last three centuries. Students will also explore basic features of Hasidic culture and thought in their historical development. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Man vs. Machine: Resistance to New Technology since the Industrial Revolution
AS.140.356 (01)

This course analyzes various episodes of “luddism” in the history of science and technology, from the destruction of textile machinery in the early 1800s up to recent controversies about robots and vaccines. What explains why different groups of actors did (or did not) resist the introduction of new technologies, ranging from the bicycle and the automobile to the nuclear energy plant? What types of fears did these technologies arouse? What can history teach us about the current recurring concern that technological innovation might destroy more jobs than it generates? These are some of the themes we will be examining in this seminar on the basis of research presentations and classroom discussions of assigned articles and book chapters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Empires of Capital: The British and American Empires in Global Historical Perspective
AS.191.318 (01)

What is the relationship between capitalism and empire in modern times? The history of capitalism and the history of imperialism are often treated as separate subjects. By contrast, this course begins with the hypothesis that modern empires were the progenitors of capitalist globalization, and that capitalism has been an international or geopolitical system from its earliest inceptions. The purpose of the course, then, is to engage students in a dual exploration of the political economy of modern empires and the geopolitical dimensions of modern capitalism, with a focus on Britain and the United States. We will draw our course readings from a diverse array of theoretical and historical sources on capitalism, empire and global political economy. The overarching aim of the course is to excavate how imperial histories can illuminate the nature of contemporary globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, David Kenneth
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Fanusie, Fatimah
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL

The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. Lee
AS.211.315 (01)

As is clear from current events and debates surrounding monuments to the Confederacy, monuments play an outsize role in the public negotiation of history and identity and the creation of communal forms of memory. We will study the traditions of monuments and monumentality around the world – including statues and buildings along with alternative forms of monumentality – from antiquity to the present day. We will examine the ways that monuments have been favored methods for the powerful to signal identity and authorize history. This course will also explore the phenomenon of “counter-monumentality”, whereby monuments are transformed and infused with new meaning. These kinds of monuments can be mediums of expression and commemoration for minority and diaspora communities and other groups outside the economic and political systems that endow and erect traditional public monuments. The first half of the course will examine the theoretical framework of monumentality, with a focus on ancient monuments from the ancient Near East (e.g., Solomon’s temple). More contemporary examples will be explored in the second half of the course through lectures and also field trips. We will view contemporary debates around monuments in America in light of the long history of monuments and in comparison with global examples of monuments and counter-monuments. All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Literature of the Holocaust
AS.211.440 (01)

How has the Holocaust been represented in literature? Are there special challenges posed by genocide to the social and aesthetic traditions of representation? Where does the Holocaust fit in to the array of concerns that literature expresses? And where does literature fit in to the commemoration of communal tragedy and the working through of individual trauma entailed by thinking about and representing the Holocaust? These questions will guide our consideration of a range of texts — nonfiction, novels, poetry — originally written in Yiddish, German, English, French and other languages (including works by Primo Levi and Isaac Bashevis Singer). A special focus will be works written during and in the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust. All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR, MLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/4
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Introduction to Africana Studies
AS.362.112 (01)

This course introduces students to the field of Africana Studies. It focuses on the historical experience, intellectual ideas, theories, and cultural production of African-descended people. We will consider how people of the black diaspora remember and encounter Africa.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Liberation in the African Diaspora
AS.362.318 (01)

This course explores the historical, theoretical, and political question of liberation in the African diaspora from the period of enslavement up to the current era. We will consider three major themes: enslavement, marronage, and freedom; Pan-Africanism and anti-colonialism; Black Power and national liberation. We will examine how African peoples conceptualized freedom and liberation in each period, the major organizations and intellectuals who framed them, and how popular activity developed and informed all three (ideas, organizations, and intellectuals). Some of the questions taken up include: How did enslaved Africans conceptualize freedom? Did their ideas and activities merely extend western notions of liberty and freedom, or did they develop distinct conceptions of freedom, rights, and humanity? Why, in the early Twentieth Century, did African peoples around the world pursue pan-Africanism as a political philosophy? How do class, nationality, gender, and sexuality inform such movements? Did national liberation struggles from the 1950s through the 1970s in Africa and the Caribbean bring about fundamental changes to those societies or merely replicate colonial regimes? What connections existed between national liberation movements in Africa and the Caribbean, and Civil Rights and Black Power in the United States and England?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Makalani, Minkah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 28/35
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Queer Performativity
AS.363.346 (01)

Introduces students to the intersections of queer theory, performance studies, and LGBTQ history with a focus on “queer worldmaking:” the ways in which performances—both theatrical and everyday rituals—have the ability to establish alternative views of the world. Case studies include the ballroom scene in Baltimore and beyond, migratory street youth subcultures, and queer nightlife. This course also offers a unique lens on the archive and historical research by approaching embodied memory, gestures, and ritual as systems for learning, storing, and transmitting cultural knowledge.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Researching the Africana Archive: Black Cemetery Stories
AS.389.314 (01)

This community-engaged course will address the historic role of the African American cemetery and its present dilemmas. Operating in partnership with Mount Auburn Cemetery in Baltimore, owned and operated by the Sharp Street Memorial United Methodist Church, and the Laurel Cemetery Memorial Project, in tandem with classes at Morgan State University and Coppin State University, our collective aim is to further the interests of these local sites by researching and telling stories with community and biographical relevance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Dean, Gabrielle
  • Room: BLC 2030
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.245 (01)Netherlandish Painting in the Fifteenth Century: Broederlam to BoschTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177HART-RENBAR, HART-MED
AS.010.330 (01)Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRustem, UnverGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED
AS.010.336 (01)Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century GermanyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStolurow, Benjamin IsaacGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.010.465 (01)Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman EmpireTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverLatrobe 120INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.061.396 (01)Modern Paris on FilmTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM, W 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsMason, LauraBloomberg 178FILM-CRITST
AS.100.118 (01)Introduction to the Middle EastTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNoor, Rao Mohsin AliHodson 316HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.170 (01)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieShaffer 202INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.170 (02)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieShaffer 202INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.210 (01)The 1619 Project: History and Public DebateTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSmaldone, Gregory JWyman Park N105HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US
AS.100.218 (01)Paris Noire: Black American Women in the City of LightsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPilatte, Malaurie JacquelineLatrobe 107HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.228 (01)Changing the World: Philanthropy in the Twentieth CenturyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Taylor SGilman 219HIST-US
AS.100.245 (01)Islam East of the Middle East: The Interconnected Histories of Islam in AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHalladay, AndrewGilman 219INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.250 (01)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPearsall, SarahHodson 203HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (02)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPearsall, SarahHodson 203HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.252 (01)Sex and the American CityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGill Peterson, JulesGreenhouse 113HIST-US
AS.100.256 (01)History of KabbalahM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 308HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.262 (01)Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle EastMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMel-Leithy, TamerAmes 320INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.265 (01)A History of Health, Healing, (Bio)Medicine, and Power in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMazzeo, Vincenza FAmes 218HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.295 (01)American Thought since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 119HIST-US
AS.100.295 (02)American Thought since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 119HIST-US
AS.100.303 (01)Old Regime and Revolutionary FranceTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, MichaelGilman 217INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.372 (01)African Cities: Environment, Gender, and Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGondola, Didier DidierGilman 377HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethKrieger 300HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.388 (01)Practicing Historical ResearchWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, SashaHodson 315
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.396 (01)The Gender Binary and American EmpireTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGill Peterson, JulesGilman 10HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 308INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.428 (01)Saints, Saviors, and Sovereigns in the Early Modern WorldTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMNoor, Rao Mohsin AliGilman 17HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.445 (01)Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of RightsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WKrieger 304HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.446 (01)Making Medieval History in 'Modern' AmericaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLester, AnneBLC 4040HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.450 (03)History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at HopkinsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJones, Martha Suzanne INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.450 (08)History Research Lab: Black Intellectuals in South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 77INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William THodson 313INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.495 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPearsall, Sarah 
AS.130.352 (01)History of HasidismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.356 (01)Man vs. Machine: Resistance to New Technology since the Industrial RevolutionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleGilman 300MSCH-HUM
AS.191.318 (01)Empires of Capital: The British and American Empires in Global Historical PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMJohnson, David KennethMaryland 104POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFanusie, FatimahLatrobe 107INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMProietti, LeonardoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL
AS.211.315 (01)The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. LeeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel JacobGilman 479MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.440 (01)Literature of the HolocaustT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel JacobGilman 55MLL-HEBR, MLL-ENGL
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHodson 315INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHodson 315INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.362.112 (01)Introduction to Africana StudiesWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMMott, Shani TKrieger 308
AS.362.318 (01)Liberation in the African DiasporaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMakalani, MinkahHodson 203HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.363.346 (01)Queer PerformativityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPlaster, JosephGilman 186
AS.389.314 (01)Researching the Africana Archive: Black Cemetery StoriesW 2:00PM - 4:30PMDean, GabrielleBLC 2030PMUS-PRAC