Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Sculpture and Ideology in the Middle Ages
AS.010.252 (01)

This lecture course will offer a selective, thematic exploration of the art of sculpture as practiced in the Middle Ages, from the fall of the Roman empire in the 4th century CE to height of the Gothic era. The primary concern will be to analyze sculpture in all of its forms – monumental free-standing, architectural, liturgical, and commemorative – as the primary medium utilized by patrons, both private and corporate, to display political messages to an ever growing public.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lakey, Christopher
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600
AS.010.329 (01)

Centered on modern-day Turkey and encompassing vast territories in Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1923) was the longest lived and among the most powerful Islamic states in history, with an artistic tradition to match. This course explores the functional and symbolic role that architecture played during the empire’s formative centuries, when three successive capital — Bursa, Edirne, and Istanbul — served to visualize the sultans’ growing claims to universal authority. With reference to mosques, palaces, tombs, and other categories of architecture, the course will examine the buildings in their artistic, social, and political contexts. Themes to be addressed include patronage and audience, architectural practice and the building trade, ceremonial and ritual, topography and urban planning, and the relationship of Ottoman architecture to other traditions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Art and Science in the Middle Ages
AS.010.403 (01)

This course investigates the intersections of art and science from the Carolingian period through the fourteenth century and the historical role images played in the pursuit of epistemic truths. Science – from the Latin scientia, or knowledge – in the Middle Ages included a broad range of intellectual pursuits into both the supernatural and natural worlds, and scholars have classified these pursuits in various ways (i.e. experimental or theoretical science, practical science, magic, and natural philosophy). A particular focus of this seminar will be placed on the assimilation of Greek and Islamic scientific advances in cartography, cosmology, and optical theory into the Latin theological tradition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lakey, Christopher
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (03)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (04)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

Introduction to three major themes in African history, from the precolonial era to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/38
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

Magicians, Mystics, and Spiritualists of the 16th and 17th Centuries
AS.100.137 (01)

This course will acquaint the student with the most important magicians, mystics, and spiritualists of the early modern period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe
AS.100.216 (01)

This course explores the series of religious and political conflicts that make up what are known now as the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hinchliff, Catherine M
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Love, Sex, and Marriage in Medieval Europe
AS.100.222 (01)

This course examines sexual desire and romantic attachment in medieval Europe, as well as the interpersonal, economic, and spiritual relations medieval society negotiated through sex and marriage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Hadzhikova, Kalina Valentinova
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role within Europe and the world from the 18th century to the ‘Refugee Crisis’, climate change and EU politics today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Pop History from King Arthur to Game of Thrones
AS.100.242 (01)

This course asks students to engage with a wide range of media and texts to explore the way history has functioned in popular culture and politics. Material will range from c.1500-the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Megerian, Jonathan Ryan
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

This course examines Iberian-Asian relations in the early modern period. It enriches and complicates our understandings of important concepts, such as colonialism, religious conversion, and global trade.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations
AS.100.258 (01)

Students will examine marriage in the United States historically and theoretically, as well as matrimony’s role in contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Lauren B
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Crossing the Literary Color Line
AS.100.266 (01)

This course will focus on African American writers who wrote white-life novels. We will examine how writers of the interwar period crossed the literary color line in an attempt to imagine a different kind of reality – one predicated on interracialism and democracy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Maryland 309
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.293 (01)

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Seminar in History
AS.100.293 (02)

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Furstenberg, Francois
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Qing Empire and its Global Context
AS.100.311 (01)

This is an upper level undergraduate class. It offers a case-based global history of early modern empires.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Wu, Man-Chu
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016
AS.100.337 (01)

The history of the formation of an American-led liberal international order and challenges to that order between the years of 1914 and 2016.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Delehanty, Sean T
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

Survey of the history of China from ca. 1895 to ca. 1976.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present
AS.100.360 (01)

The Modern British World introduces some of the major events, themes, and controversies that led to Britain’s global dominance and ultimate decline as an imperial power. This course focuses on varying forms of imperial governance, the interrelationships between metropole and colony, and the formation of British and colonial national identities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle Ages
AS.100.383 (01)

Compares religious transformation in medieval Europe and the Middle East (ca. 600-1500), including conquest and conversion; conversion narratives; apostasy, martyrdom and other encounters between medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Prerequisite: 1 history course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE

John Locke
AS.100.404 (01)

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at Hopkins
AS.100.450 (03)

It is time at Johns Hopkins University to rewrite out own history, one that takes a frank look at how race and racism have shaped the university and its community. This research seminar will build upon the recent revelations about found Johns Hopkins, his family and their relationships to slave holding. Taught as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project, this seminar will center on new student research into the private and public records of early American, aiming to provide new insights into the nature and extent of Mr. Hopkins involvement in slavery and the lives of those Black Americans whom he held enslaved. Students will read deeply into the history of slavery, will learn new research techniques, and will publish the results of their work as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project. Students will also participate in public seminars where, alongside experts, they will bring this history to broader audiences, including the university community and residents of Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jones, Martha Suzanne
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

History Research Lab: Digital History
AS.100.450 (04)

Digital history and humanities application for graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Jessica Marie
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

The Inquisition in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.480 (01)

Examines the Inquisition in early modern Italy, Spain, Portugal, and the Iberian empires, with an emphasis on politics, gender, and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

Study of Western, Chinese, and Japanese understandings of the history of China, emphasizing their implications for cultural understanding and for policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Senior Honors Seminar
AS.100.494 (01)

A two-semester coordinating seminar for history majors writing senior honors theses. Admission is granted by instructor only after the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor. AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The sixties were a decade of unrest, failed revolutions, and fundamental change across Europe and the US. We will look at how these years changed the world through the lens of national case studies and community engagement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

History of Hasidism
AS.130.136 (01)

Although it appears to be a relic of pre-modern Judaism, Hasidism is a phenomenon of the modern era of Jewish history. This course surveys the political and social history of the Hasidic movement over the course of the last three centuries. Students will also explore basic features of Hasidic culture and thought in their historical development. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient World
AS.130.206 (01)

The consumption of alcohol is one of the oldest known human practices. Almost every culture has some type of mind-altering beverage that influences and shapes many facets of society. This course is a cross-cultural examination of the power and significance of alcohol in the ancient world. From the Neolithic to the Classical symposium to the Egyptian festival, the importance of communal drinking—alcohol or otherwise—is a uniting factor across the ancient world. This class will unpack the impact and significance of alcohol across a wide-range of ancient cultures, and examine what the study of alcohol might reveal about ancient societies. This includes alcohol as medicine, its religious and ritual functions, alcohol as a community unifier (and divider) and identity builder, and its practical and economic uses. Students will apply anthropological and archaeological theories to understand why, how, and to what effect humans drink.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moroney, Morgan E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Fissell, Mary E
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Fissell, Mary E
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Fissell, Mary E
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11
AS.194.202 (01)

In partnership with the social justice organization Justice for Muslims Collective, this community-engaged course and oral history project will explore how diverse Muslim communities navigated and contested belonging and political and cultural agency amidst state-sponsored violence and national debates on race, gender, citizenship and national security after 9/11 and during the ongoing War on Terror. Through history, ethnography, first-person narratives, film, fiction, and online resources, students will learn about the impact of 9/11 on American Muslim communities. This includes cultural and political resistance to imperialism, racism, and Islamophobia as well as to intersectional inequities within Muslim communities that were intensified in the context of Islamophobia. Students will learn about community activism and organizing from JMC, and complete a participatory action research project with the organization. This project is an oral history archive that will address gaps in the documentation of movement histories when it comes to early organizing against War on Terror policies by Muslim communities and communities racialized or perceived as Muslim. Students will be trained to record stories of resistance among leaders who organized and responded at the local and national-level in the Greater Washington region, to support the building of an archive that will shape a wide variety of future organizing and advocacy efforts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Renaissance Witches and Demonology
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in medicine, theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 26/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Hackerman 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 3:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room: Shaffer 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (02)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hands on History: Material Cultures of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Digital Age
AS.389.165 (01)

This hands-on course deals entirely with JHU’s collections of rare books and manuscripts as a springboard to build skills in the close visual and physical examination of rare books and manuscripts. You will investigate the technological and aesthetic transformation of textual artifacts from ancient papyri to Gutenberg imprints to digital surrogates, and contribute to the accumulation of historical clues about their meaning and significance as material cultural objects. You will learn what goes into curating and conserving book and manuscript collections today, and how to evaluate the quality and significance of collections. Materials/topics will include ancient Babylonian cuneiform and Egyptian papyri; medieval illuminated manuscripts; incunabula; Renaissance illustrated books of the Scientific Revolution and Spanish Golden Age; cheap print and unique ephemera; early books by and about women; forgeries; and “digital humanities” initiatives at JHU. Students will make regular visits to the Special Collections Reading Room in the BLC throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Havens, Earle Ashcroft, II.
  • Room: BLC Macksey
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.252 (01)Sculpture and Ideology in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLakey, ChristopherGilman 177
AS.010.329 (01)Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverAmes 218
AS.010.403 (01)Art and Science in the Middle AgesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLakey, Christopher 
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual OnlineHIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual OnlineHIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (03)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual OnlineHIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (04)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual OnlineHIST-LATAM
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 132HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.137 (01)Magicians, Mystics, and Spiritualists of the 16th and 17th CenturiesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszBloomberg 178HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.216 (01)Reformation and Counter Reformation EuropeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHinchliff, Catherine MBloomberg 276HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.222 (01)Love, Sex, and Marriage in Medieval EuropeWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMHadzhikova, Kalina ValentinovaBloomberg 278HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 50HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.242 (01)Pop History from King Arthur to Game of ThronesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMegerian, Jonathan RyanKrieger 180HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, FrancisKrieger 306INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.258 (01)Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present ConsiderationsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Lauren BSmokler Center 301HIST-US
AS.100.266 (01)Crossing the Literary Color LineW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani TMaryland 309HIST-US
AS.100.293 (01)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKim, HayangGilman 400
AS.100.293 (02)Undergraduate Seminar in HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFurstenberg, Francois 
AS.100.311 (01)The Qing Empire and its Global ContextTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWu, Man-Chu HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.337 (01)American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDelehanty, Sean TGilman 413INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 132INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.360 (01)The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the presentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.383 (01)Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, TamerBloomberg 168HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.404 (01)John LockeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 400INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WMaryland 104INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.450 (03)History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at HopkinsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMJones, Martha SuzanneLatrobe 120HIST-US
AS.100.450 (04)History Research Lab: Digital HistoryF 1:30PM - 4:00PMJohnson, Jessica MarieSmokler Center 213HIST-US
AS.100.480 (01)The Inquisition in Early Modern EuropeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, Erin HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.494 (01)Senior Honors SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, ErinMaryland 114
AS.100.497 (01)The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.130.136 (01)History of HasidismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
AS.130.206 (01)Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoroney, Morgan E NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EVirtual OnlineMSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EVirtual OnlineMSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EVirtual OnlineMSCH-HUM
AS.194.202 (01)Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11T 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 219INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffGilman 219INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.477 (01)Renaissance Witches and DemonologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoHodson 313INST-CP
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMJackson, Lawrence PHackerman 320
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityTh 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 3:30PM - 4:30PMShepard, ToddShaffer 202
AS.363.201 (02)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityTh 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:00PMShepard, Todd 
AS.389.165 (01)Hands on History: Material Cultures of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Digital AgeT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHavens, Earle Ashcroft, II.BLC MackseyPMUS-INTRO
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PHodson 303HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL