Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. A selection of current class syllabi for the semester can be found on the course syllabi page.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses with numbers 100–299 are designed for freshmen and sophomores but are open to all undergraduate students. Advanced courses, with numbers 300–599, are generally designed for students who have completed introductory courses in the appropriate area.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: U.S. History of the Present
AS.001.120 (01)

Which ideas, movements, problems, and conflicts define the contemporary United States—and where did they come from? In this First Year Seminar we’ll study the history of this country over the last three decades to try to answer those questions. Using a range of written and visual materials, we’ll investigate the history behind concepts like “globalization,” “the free market,” “identity politics,” “culture wars,” and the “War on Terror,” and discuss the causes and consequences of the debates they provoked in this period. We’ll also assess what’s appealing and challenging about studying the very recent past and using it to interpret our present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Brann, Allon Yagoda
  • Room: BLC 4040
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Haitian Revolution
AS.001.145 (01)

Long overshadowed by the American and French Revolutions, the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) is now widely recognized as one of the most important events in modern history. The most radical of the Atlantic Revolutions, it began with a massive uprising of the enslaved against the institution of slavery and culminated in the independence of the nation of Haiti. This First-Year Seminar will examine the origins, course, and legacy of the Revolution, addressing such issues as colonialism, racism, slavery, emancipation, human rights, and national sovereignty – issues that continue to shape the contemporary world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Apartheid as Analogy - Structures of Racial Hierarchy in South Africa, Baltimore, and Beyond
AS.001.159 (01)

Sites of racial conflict, from Palestine to Baltimore, have been compared to South African Apartheid. This First-Year Seminar examines the creation of a totalizing system of racial segregation and exploitation in twentieth century South Africa, and how it can help us understand histories of race elsewhere in the world, including our own city.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Books, Authenticity, and Truth
AS.001.161 (01)

We are living through a crisis in how we take in information. Bombarded by information of all sorts coming at us on phones, tablets, and computer screens, it can be difficult to make sense of it all and harder still to determine whether something is true or false, authentic or inauthentic. The scale and speed of the change in media that we are undergoing is unprecedented in human history. Nevertheless, people in the past have faced moments of crisis – moments when writing seemed unreliable, when the format of written information changed, and when new publication formats forced reevaluations of the nature of truth. This First-Year Seminar will take us from Greco-Roman antiquity to the modern age, with stops along the way in the European Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Enlightenment. We will read selected texts that illuminate the place of writing, books, and the search for truth, think about the structure of libraries in the western Middle Ages and Renaissance, do extensive hands-on work with rare books, and visit other repositories of information, all toward the end of evaluating how the history of books and information can help us in our current quest to make sense of our world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Celenza, Chris
  • Room: BLC 2030
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Black Baltimore Archives - From Frederick Douglass to Billie Holiday
AS.001.163 (01)

This First-Year Seminar carefully considers the lives and works of two globally famous Black Baltimoreans: the abolitionist and statesman Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), and the premier jazz vocalist Billie Holiday (1915-1959). While we will explore key writings and performances of their work, the course also wants to use their historical lives in Baltimore to enrich our knowledge of the city and archival resources that reveal its past. During the semester we will consult a variety of primary resources like newspapers, novels, photographs, rare documents, correspondence, and recorded sound to investigate the complex and intraracial world of Baltimore in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the questions we will be considering: How did the city’s black abolitionist and religious networks contribute to Frederick Douglass’s evolution as a journalist and politician? What was the role of Chesapeake Bay black musical culture—ragtime, marching bands, banjo and fiddle ditties, and riverboat music—in the creation of Billie Holiday’s unique stylistic expression and singing? In what manner did Baltimore’s racial segregation and racism define her life and art? Students are required to visit three archival repositories during scheduled in-class trips, including a visit to the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The final project is an archive-laden digital story map.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 2:30PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Pleasures of the Imagination - British culture in the eighteenth century
AS.001.166 (01)

Music, Art, plays, novels, satires, and material culture all expanded dramatically in Britain in the long eighteenth century (c. 1714-1830). Contemporaries spoke of the rise of 'beauty', of the appreciation of the 'pleasures of the imagination', and of the rise of a culture of 'happiness'. This First-Year Seminar will introduce students to these exciting developments in British (and British American) culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Inventing a City - Exploring Baltimore Through Maps and Mapping
AS.001.169 (01)

Using maps from the 17th century to the present, students in this First-Year Seminar will explore the historical and contemporary landscape of their new hometown -- Baltimore. These primary sources will show how Baltimore was invented and developed in popular imagination to become the most vital port on the US Eastern Seaboard, but also a symbol American post-industrial decline. Students will have the chance to map how they see Baltimore, by learning and applying Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and converting geospatial data into visual stories. With the goal of fostering a deeper understanding of this complex city, and a student’s place in it, the class will include explorations outside of the classroom. The course will culminate with the creation of a small exhibit whose content and venue will be decided upon mutually by students during the course of the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 2:30PM
  • Instructor: Denis, Lena Zander, Finkelstein, Lori
  • Room: Hmwd House Wine Cllr
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sex, Death, and Gender: The Body in Premodern Art, Medicine, and Culture, c. 1300-1600
AS.010.339 (01)

To what extent was the body and its depiction a site of contestation, identification, or desire in the Middle Ages and Renaissance? If the body in the West since the 1800s is seen to have been shaped by the rise of photography and film, the institutionalization of biomedicine, and the establishment of techniques of surveyance and mechanization, then how was the body represented, disciplined, and experienced in the preceding centuries? In an age of unprecedented encounter with non-European bodies, what did it mean to describe and categorize bodies by race, region, or religion? These are some of the major questions this class seeks to answer, which is fundamentally interdisciplinary as it draws upon insights and methods from anthropology and the history of medicine and history of science to investigate how the body has been represented and imagined in the visual arts. The bodies of the suffering Christ, the female mystic, the dissected cadaver, the punished criminal, and the non-European ‘Other’ will loom large as we work to problematize notions of a normative body, whether in the premodern world or in the contemporary one. While most readings and lectures will concern the body and its representation in the Christian West during the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, students are encouraged to work on a topic of their choosing from any geographical area 1000-1800 CE for their research papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Allsopp, Ben William
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM


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Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (03)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)
AS.100.122 (01)

An introduction to the African past since 1880.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Gondola, Didier Didier
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Approaches to Jewish History
AS.100.128 (01)

The course will provide an introduction to the study of Jewish History.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Modern African American History, 1896 – present
AS.100.190 (01)

This course introduces students to the defining social, political, and cultural moments that reflect the experience of African Americans in the United States, 1896 – present. Topics include the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Freedom Struggle, African American politics, urban rebellion, mass incarceration, Hip Hop culture, the current movement for Black Lives, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wright Rigueur, Leah M
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US


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West African History
AS.100.251 (01)

This course explores the rich history of West Africa and its place in the broader world. Topics include the environmental history of the Sahara desert, West African empires, and the rise of Nollywood and contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Keegan, Thomas
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Historical Methods, Archives and Interpretations
AS.100.293 (01)

Surveys methods, approaches, and practices of historical writing. It asks students to think about the questions historians ask, the archives they use, and the arguments they make. Students will be introduced to subversive and emancipatory potential of contemporary scholarship that importantly incorporates subaltern, marginalized, or formerly forgotten voices.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ecstasy: Mystical, Visionary, and Holy Women and their Writings in Medieval Europe, ca. 1000-1400
AS.100.304 (01)

This course uses the writings of medieval women to explore their social and religious worlds and orients visionary writing within the broader narrative of religious movements from the 12th-14th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Bond, Laurence Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL

Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850
AS.100.321 (01)

This course will examine both the Haitian Revolution and the early period of Mexican independence by engaging with the ideas of actors within these events in international contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Borocz-Johnson, Lee Michael
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

The Islamic Age of Empires
AS.100.327 (01)

In this course we will survey the political, social, intellectual, and cultural history of the three Islamic early modern gunpowder empires that ranged from “the Balkans to Bengal”: The Ottomans (1300-1922), the Safavids (1501-1736), and the Mughals (1526-1858).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Noor, Rao Mohsin Ali
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness
AS.100.354 (01)

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US


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Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Free Speech and Censorship in the United States
AS.100.433 (01)

This undergraduate research seminar examines censorship laws, practices, and debates over the past century; topics include political radicalism, indecency, pornography, and racist hate speech. In addition to discussing common readings, each student will choose a censorship case or issue to research and present to the class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jelavich, Peter
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

History Research Lab: Asian Diaspora in Baltimore
AS.100.450 (07)

Help build a set of digital and visual resources on local histories of Baltimore-area Asian diasporic communities. Training in research and curatorial tools such as critical oral history and digital storytelling will be provided. Opportunities to collaborate with local community organizations will be available. No prior experience necessary.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Yumi
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US


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Up the Nile: New Approaches to the History of Egyptology and Nubiology
AS.130.248 (01)

King Tut, Napoleon, Champollion, Ozymandias, Nefertiti: the history of Egyptology is filled with big characters, huge monuments, and glimmering objects. But it is also made up of colonialist practices, looted sites, and forgotten scholarly contributions. “Up the Nile” examines the antiquarian, colonialist, racist, Western-centric, and patriarchal roots of modern Egyptology and Nubiology, and addresses how scholars and enthusiasts alike are continuing to grapple with these lasting legacies and biases. This class investigates how the Egyptians and Nubians thought of their own histories, as well as how other ancient cultures viewed the cultures of the Nile. It moves roughly chronologically, tracing understudied and marginalized voices from the Islamic, Medieval, and Ottoman periods into the 20th and 21st centuries. It examines the origins of scholarship, modern collecting, Egyptomania, and museums, delving into the problems and repercussions that still haunt us today. “Up the Nile” will engage with important and difficult aspects regarding Egyptology’s and Nubiology’s colonialist, racist, and sexist past and present. It asks: who decides who writes history, then and now?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Moroney, Morgan E
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (04)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind as well as divide a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Museums and Identity
AS.211.329 (01)

The museum boom of the last half-century has centered largely around museums dedicated to the culture and history of identity groups, including national, ethnic, religious, and minority groups. In this course we will examine such museums and consider their long history through a comparison of the theory and practice of Jewish museums with other identity museums. We will study the various museological traditions that engage identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, heritage museums, art museums, and other museums of culture. Some of the questions we will ask include: what are museums for and who are they for? how do museums shape identity? and how do the various types of museums relate to one another? Our primary work will be to examine a variety of contemporary examples around the world with visits to local museums including the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-RELATE

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Dante Visits the Afterlife
AS.214.479 (01)

One of the greatest works of literature of all times, the Divine Comedy leads us down into the torture-pits of Hell, up the steep mountain terrain of Purgatory, through the “virtual” space of Paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. We accompany Dante on his journey, building along the way knowledge of medieval Italian history, literature, philosophy, politics, and religion. The course also focuses on the arts of reading deeply, asking questions of a text, and interpreting literary and scholarly works through discussion and critical writing. Conducted in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Novelist Intellectuals
AS.215.406 (01)

What does a novelist’s op-ed about economics have to do with her literary writing? In what ways does a fiction writer’s essays on the environment inform how we read her novels? What happens when we find the political opinions of a writer objectionable? This undergraduate seminar will consider what the Spanish writer Francisco Ayala termed “novelist intellectuals,” that is, literary writers who actively participate in a society’s public sphere. Considering writers from Madrid to New York, from London to Buenos Aires, we will ask how one should hold a novelist’s fictional and non-fictional writings in the balance and explore ways of reading that allow us to consider the public intellectual side and the aesthetic side of a novelist together.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.326 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of Mexico
AS.360.420 (01)

Learn the basics of ArcGIS and data management as you help Prof. Lurtz publish an agricultural dataset and maps from 10 years before Mexico erupted in revolution. No experience necessary.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Anti-Racism 101
AS.362.102 (01)

What is Anti-Racism? How do we identify racism’s presence and effects, and how do we direct social and civic resources to end it? In this Freshman Seminar, students will learn from a series of faculty experts and invited guests about the history, workings, and legacies of racism. They’ll also study present-day and past approaches – attempted and theorized – to abolish racism in the modern world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Connolly, Nathan D
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction to Africana Studies
AS.362.112 (01)

This course introduces students to the field of Africana Studies. It focuses on the historical experience, intellectual ideas, theories, and cultural production of African-descended people. We will consider how people of the black diaspora remember and encounter Africa. We will explore, too, how such people have lived, spoken, written, and produced art about colonialism and enslavement, gender and mobility, violence and pleasure. This course will be thematically organized and invite you to center your own stories about black people within your understanding of the modern world and its making.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course will serve as an intensive introduction to contemporary approaches to theories of gender and sexuality, and their relationship to cultural production and politics. Students will develop a historically situated knowledge of the development of feminist and queer scholarship in the 20th and 21st centuries, and consider the multiply intersecting forces which shape understandings of sexual and gender identity. We will consider both foundational questions (What is gender? Who is the subject of feminism? What defines queerness?) and questions of aesthetic and political strategy, and spend substantial time engaging with feminist and queer scholarship in comparative contexts. Students will be introduced to debates in Black feminism, intersectionality theory, third world feminism, socialist feminism, queer of colour critique, and trans* theory. We will read both canonical texts and recent works of scholarship, and the final weeks of the course will be devoted to thinking with our theoretical and historical readings against a selection of feminist and queer literature and cinema. No prior familiarity with the study of gender and sexuality is necessary.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Jo Aurelio
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an Introduction
AS.363.302 (01)

Women in Western Thought is an introduction to (the history of) Western thought from the margins of the canon. The class introduces you to some key philosophical question, focusing on some highlights of women’s thought in Western thought, most of which are commonly and unjustly neglected. The seminar will be organized around a number of paradigmatic cases, such as the mind/body question in Early Modern Europe, the declaration of the rights of (wo)men during the French revolution, the impact of slavery on philosophical thought, the MeToo debate and others. By doing so, the course will cover a range of issues, such as the nature of God, contract theory, slavery, standpoint epistemology, and queer feminist politics. Students will engage with questions about what a canon is, and who has a say in that. In this sense, Women in Western Thought introduces you to some crucial philosophical and political problems and makes you acquainted with some women in the field. The long term objective of a class on women in Western thought must be to empower, to inspire independence, and to resist the sanctioned ignorance often times masked as universal knowledge and universal history. People of all genders tend to suffer from misinformation regarding the role of women and the gender of thought more generally. By introducing you to women who took it upon themselves to resist the obstacles of their time, I am hoping to provide role models for your individual intellectual and political development. By introducing you to the historical conditions of the exclusion and oppression of women (including trans and queer women as well as black women and women of color), I hope to enable you to generate the sensitivities that are required to navigate the particular social relations of the diverse world you currently inhabit. By introducing philosophical topics in this way, I hope to enable you to have a positive, diversifying influence on you future endeavours.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: deLire, Luce Marcella
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Ancient Color: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in Antiquity
AS.389.315 (01)

What role did the colorful surfaces of sculptures, vessels and textiles play in the ancient world? We examine historical texts and recent scholarly and scientific publications on the technologies and meanings of color in antiquity, and use imaging and analytical techniques to study polychromed objects from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita
  • Room: Gilman 150A
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, ARCH-ARCH

Women of the Book: Female Miracle Workers, Mystics, and Material Culture, 1450-1800
AS.389.325 (01)

From psycho-spiritual autobiographers to mystical bi-locating nuns, convent crèche-keepers to choristers of sacred music, from rock-star-status mystics to the hidden careers of women printers, engravers, and miracle-makers, this course will explore the remarkable intellectual, cultural, and imaginative contributions of women who found refuge, agency, and power within alternative lives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Champagne, Kelsey Elizabeth, Havens, Earle A
  • Room: BLC Macksey
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a


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Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.120 (01)FYS: U.S. History of the PresentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBrann, Allon YagodaBLC 4040
AS.001.145 (01)FYS: The Haitian RevolutionTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, MichaelGilman 134
AS.001.159 (01)FYS: Apartheid as Analogy - Structures of Racial Hierarchy in South Africa, Baltimore, and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornberry, ElizabethGreenhouse 113
AS.001.161 (01)FYS: Books, Authenticity, and TruthT 2:00PM - 4:30PMCelenza, ChrisBLC 2030
AS.001.163 (01)FYS: Black Baltimore Archives - From Frederick Douglass to Billie HolidayW 12:00PM - 2:30PMJackson, Lawrence PMergenthaler 266
AS.001.166 (01)FYS: The Pleasures of the Imagination - British culture in the eighteenth centuryTh 10:30AM - 1:00PMMarshall, John WGilman 308
AS.001.169 (01)FYS: Inventing a City - Exploring Baltimore Through Maps and MappingF 12:00PM - 2:30PMDenis, Lena Zander, Finkelstein, LoriHmwd House Wine Cllr
AS.010.339 (01)Sex, Death, and Gender: The Body in Premodern Art, Medicine, and Culture, c. 1300-1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAllsopp, Ben WilliamGilman 119HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM
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AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 55HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.115 (03)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 55HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.122 (01)Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGondola, Didier DidierGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.128 (01)Approaches to Jewish HistoryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszCroft Hall G02HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.190 (01)Modern African American History, 1896 – presentTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWright Rigueur, Leah MGilman 75HIST-US
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AS.100.251 (01)West African HistoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKeegan, ThomasGilman 400HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.293 (01)Historical Methods, Archives and InterpretationsWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, SashaShaffer 100
AS.100.304 (01)Ecstasy: Mystical, Visionary, and Holy Women and their Writings in Medieval Europe, ca. 1000-1400TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBond, Laurence JosephGilman 308HIST-EUROPE, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL
AS.100.321 (01)Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBorocz-Johnson, Lee MichaelKrieger 302HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.327 (01)The Islamic Age of EmpiresMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNoor, Rao Mohsin AliMaryland 201HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William THodson 316INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.354 (01)Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing WhitenessW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani TShriver Hall 104HIST-US
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AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TGilman 77INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.433 (01)Free Speech and Censorship in the United StatesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJelavich, PeterShriver Hall 001HIST-US
AS.100.450 (07)History Research Lab: Asian Diaspora in BaltimoreT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, YumiGilman 217HIST-US
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AS.130.248 (01)Up the Nile: New Approaches to the History of Egyptology and NubiologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMoroney, Morgan ESmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (04)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, RochelleGilman 10
AS.211.329 (01)Museums and IdentityMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobHodson 305INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-RELATE
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 219INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the AfterlifeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSaiber, ArielleShriver Hall 104ENGL-PR1800
AS.215.406 (01)Novelist IntellectualsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSeguin, Becquer DKrieger Laverty
AS.310.326 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHe, GaochaoGilman 119INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.360.420 (01)Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of MexicoMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLurtz, CaseyGreenhouse 113HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.102 (01)Anti-Racism 101TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMConnolly, Nathan DGilman 219HIST-US
AS.362.112 (01)Introduction to Africana StudiesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, Shani TKrieger Laverty
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGiardini, Jo AurelioHodson 210
AS.363.302 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an IntroductionT 4:30PM - 7:00PMdeLire, Luce MarcellaMaryland 104INST-PT, MSCH-HUM
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PMaryland 114HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.389.315 (01)Ancient Color: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in AntiquityM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBalachandran, SanchitaGilman 150AMSCH-HUM, ARCH-ARCH
AS.389.325 (01)Women of the Book: Female Miracle Workers, Mystics, and Material Culture, 1450-1800W 3:00PM - 5:30PMChampagne, Kelsey Elizabeth, Havens, Earle ABLC Macksey
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